The Prisoner of Zenda

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Wildside Press, LLC, Aug 1, 2002 - Fiction - 212 pages
12 Reviews
Because of a not-too-secret dalliance between his great-grandmother and the then King, Englishman Rudolf Rassendyll bears an striking resemblance to the king of Ruritania. Curious about his heritage, he vacations in Ruritania to see his double's coronation -- and he meets and befriends the soon-to-be-crowned King Rudolf. When the King is kidnapped by the villain, Black Michael, Rassendyll must impersonate the King in the coronation ceremony . . . and in the heart of the Queen. Hope's handling of the romance between Rassendyll and Queen Flavia is both a daring and romantic love story and a subtle examination of the meaning of honor and duty to a gentleman. An enduring action-adventure classic in the manner of Sabatini, Mundy, Dumas, and Orczy; if you haven't read _The Prisoner of Zenda_, you need to read it now.

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Review: The Prisoner of Zenda (The Ruritania Trilogy #2)

User Review  - Emil Söderman - Goodreads

Now this was a fun read. The plot should be known to most people: A person of distant relation and great likeness to the King of Ruritania becomes embroiled in a plot against said majesty, and forced ... Read full review

Review: The Prisoner of Zenda (The Ruritania Trilogy #2)

User Review  - Ubiquitousbastard - Goodreads

I sort of read this randomly, so I wasn't sure what to expect. What I did get was kind boring prose and "cleverest-woman-in-Europe" syndrome. By the last part I mean that the author is telling me ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Anthony Hope (Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins) was an English writer and playwright. Best known for his classic adventure tales The Prisoner of Zenda and Rupert of Hentzau, Hope is credited with creating the Ruritanian romance genre. Although he originally published short pieces in popular periodicals, Hope started his own publishing press because of a lack of interest in publishing his longer works. The success of The Prisoner of Zenda allowed him to give up his career in law in favour of writing full time, but his later works never achieved the same popularity as Zenda. Hope was knighted in 1918 in recognition of his work with wartime propaganda, and he continued to write steadily until his death from cancer in 1933.

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