Sketches of Indian character: being a brief survey of the principal features of character exhibited by the North American Indians: illustrating the aphorism of the socialists, that "man is the creature of circumstances."

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J. Hobson, 1841 - History - 64 pages
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Page 17 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Page 17 - Colonel Cresap, the last spring, in cold blood, and unprovoked, murdered all the relations of Logan, not even sparing my women and children. There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it: I have killed many: I have glutted my vengeance: for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace.
Page 14 - All their proceedings were conducted with great deliberation, and were., distinguished for order, decorum, and solemnity. In eloquence, in dignity, and in all the characteristics of profound policy, they surpassed an assembly of feudal barons, and were perhaps not far inferior to the great Amphyctionic Council of Greece f.
Page 60 - ... is stolen from the trees, where we have hung it to be reclaimed after the chase. Our hunting camps have been fired into ; and we have been warned that we shall no longer be permitted to pursue the deer in those forests which were so lately all our own. The fish, which in the Buffalo and...
Page 17 - This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace : but do not harbour a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 17 - Among these were, unfortunately, the family of Logan, a chief, celebrated in peace and war, and long distinguished as the friend of the whites* This unworthy return provoked his vengeance.
Page 60 - The governor must not think hard of me for speaking thus of the preachers ; I have observed their progress, and when I look back to see what has taken place of old, I perceive that whenever they came among the Indians, they were the fore-runners of their dispersion ; that they always excited enmities and quarrels among them ; that they introduced the white people on their lands, by whom they were robbed and plundered of their property ; and that the Indians were sure to dwindle and decrease, and...
Page 35 - ... people, acquire the name and reputation of men of superior knowledge, and possessed of supernatural powers. As the Indians in general believe in witchcraft, and ascribe to the arts of sorcerers many of the disorders with which they are afflicted in the regular course of nature, this class of men...
Page 28 - Life," to use their own expression, " is the sacred object of their devotion. But each man carries in his medicine bag a kind of household god, which is a small carved image about eight inches long. Its first covering is of down, over which a piece of beech bark is closely tied, and the whole is enveloped in several folds of red and blue cloth. This little figure is an object of the most pious regard.
Page 15 - Brothers — We all belong to one family, we are all children of the Great Spirit; we walk in the same path; slake our thirst at the same spring; and now affairs of the greatest concern, lead us to smoke the pipe around the same council fire! Brothers — We are friends; we must assist each other to bear our burdens. The blood of many of our fathers and brothers has run like water on the ground, to satisfy the avarice of the white men. We, ourselves, are threatened with a great evil...

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