Blood, Iron, and Gold: How the Railways Transformed the World

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PublicAffairs, Mar 2, 2010 - History - 432 pages
17 Reviews
The opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in 1830 marked the beginning of a transport revolution that would forever transform the way we live. Blood, Iron, and Gold takes us on a journey encompassing jungle, mountain, and desert, revealing the huge impact of the railroads as they spread rapidly across entire countries, and linked cities that hitherto had little reach beyond their immediate environs. The rise of the train triggered daring engineering feats, great architectural innovation, and the rapid movement of people and goods across the globe. Cultures were both enriched and destroyed by the unrelenting construction of the railroads, and the new technology quickly took on a vital role in civil conflicts and two world wars.

In this beautifully illustrated book, renowned transportation journalist Christian Wolmar celebrates the vision and determination of the ambitious pioneers who developed the railways that would dominate the globe.

 

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Review: Blood, Iron And Gold: How The Railways Transformed The World

User Review  - Goodreads

I got bogged down in the beginning, then I was drawn in for the second half. It occasionally was a bit dry, but other sections were easy to read. One other thing to keep in mind is that this book ... Read full review

Review: Blood, Iron And Gold: How The Railways Transformed The World

User Review  - Goodreads

Ok, I'll admit it. I like trains. Having grown up around them in one form or another I have fond memories of the joy they brought to me. With no driver in the household they were our day trip, weekend ... Read full review

Contents

The First Railways
1
Europe Makes a Start
17
The British Influence
45
The American Way
69
Joining Up Europe
99
Crossing America
129
and Other Continents
159
The Invasion of the Railway
191
The Railway Revolution
219
Getting Better All the Time
247
Changing Trains
273
Decline But Not Fall
297
Railway Renaissance
319
Notes
337
Bibliography
355
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About the author (2010)

Christian Wolmar is a writer and broadcaster specializing in the social history of railways and transport. He has written for major British newspapers for many years and has contributed to many other publications, including the New York Times and Newsday. He frequently appears on TV and radio as an expert commentator. His most recent books are The Subterranean Railway, a history of the London Underground, the world's oldest system, and Fire & Steam, the story of Britain's railways.

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