Making the Detective Story American: Biggers, Van Dine and Hammett and the Turning Point of the Genre, 1925-1930

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McFarland, Apr 19, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 231 pages
This critical text examines the fiction of Earl Derr Biggers, S. S. Van Dine, and Dashiell Hammett during a crucial half-decade when they transformed the detective story. The characters they created, including Charlie Chan, Philo Vance, and the Continental Op, represented a new style of detective solving crimes in fresh ways. Their successes would push crime and detective fiction in startling and rejuvenating directions. Topics covered include the highbrow detective, the ethnic detective, the exploitation of contemporary sensations, and the exploitation of women. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.
 

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User Review  - JeffreyMarks - LibraryThing

An interesting read on 3 of the top names in the genre during the mid-1920s. Read full review

Contents

Preface
1
1 Introduction
7
2 He Used to Be a Highbrow
30
3 No Chinaman
66
4 Ripped from the Headlines
97
5 Enterprising Flippant Hard
124
Three Brief Biographies
145
Appendix B
186
Appendix C
190
Chapter Notes
197
Bibliography
211
Index
217
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

J.K. Van Dover taught in the English Department of Lincoln University for 38 years; he has also taught as a Fulbright Professor of American Literature in Germany, China, Austria, and Slovakia. He has published extensively on detective fiction.

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