A Way of Being

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1995 - Psychology - 395 pages
23 Reviews

A profound and deeply personal collection of essays by renowned psychologist Carl Rogers

 

The late Carl Rogers, founder of the humanistic psychology movement and father of client-centered therapy, based his life's work on his fundamental belief in the human potential for growth. A Way of Being was written in the early 1980s, near the end of Carl Rogers's career, and serves as a coda to his classic On Becoming a Person. More philosophical than his earlier writings, it traces his professional and personal development and ends with a prophetic call for a more humane future.

 

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Review: A Way of Being

User Review  - Frank Della Torre - Goodreads

Carl Rogers, a giant of psychological history, has here written personal essays - which read almost like a diary - about his way of being which center on authenticity, openness, empathy, gentleness ... Read full review

Review: A Way of Being

User Review  - Bisan Al Hamwi - Goodreads

Great book, very diverse in content. The only negativity is repetition in some chapters. Read full review

Contents

My Philosophy of Interpersonal
27
In Retrospect FortySix Years
46
Growing Old Or Older
70
Do We Need A Reality?
96
ASPECTS OF A PERSONCENTERED
111
Empathic An Unappreciated
137
Ellen WestAnd Loneliness
164
Building PersonCentered
181
Some New Challenges to
235
Can Learning Encompass both Ideas
263
Beyond the Watershed
292
Learnings in Large Groups
316
LOOKING AHEAD A PERSONCENTERED
337
A Chronological Bibliography of
357
Acknowledgments
377
Copyright

Six Vignettes
207

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About the author (1995)

Educated at the University of Wisconsin, Carl Rogers intended to become a Protestant minister, entering the Union Theological Seminary in 1924. When he realized that he was more interested in spirituality than religion, he left the seminary. While working on his Ph.D. at Columbia University, he began to question some of the accepted techniques of psychotherapy, especially in the area of therapist-patient relationships. According to Current Biography, "he is best known as the originator of the nondirective "client centered' theory of psychotherapy. This prescribes a person-to-person, rather than a doctor-patient relationship between therapist and client, and allows the client to control the course, pace, and length of his own treatment."Rogers incorporated many of the elements of this theory into the basic structure of encounter groups. The author of many books and articles, Rogers taught at several large universities for many years and conducted a private practice as a counseling psychologist. He received many professional awards in official recognition of his high achievements, most notably the presidency of the American Psychological Association (1946--47).

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