Send Us a Lady Physician: Women Doctors in America, 1835-1920

Front Cover
Ruth J. Abram
W. W. Norton & Company, 1985 - Health & Fitness - 255 pages
In the latter part of the nineteenth century, women, who had hitherto been barred from medical schools, were gradually granted the freedom to study and practice medicine. Indeed, by 1900, over 7,000 female physicians were practicing in America. Women were sought after to fill the void in women's health care--a substantial one, thanks to Victorian mores--as well as to imbue the medical profession with dignity which only women, it was believed, could supply. Thus the stereotype of women as gentle, virtuous creatures, natural healers, worked in their favor, opening doors to a major profession.
 

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Send us a lady physician: women doctors in America, 1835-1920

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Intended for the general reader, this celebration of women pioneers in medicine includes essays by scholars, accompanied by illustrations collected for an exhibit on this subject. Four articles ... Read full review

Contents

Part
13
American Medicine in 1879 Charles E Rosenberg
21
LateNineteenthCentury Medical Instruments
35
DoItYourself the Sectarian Way Ronald L Numbers
43
Part
55
Six Pioneer Women Doctors
71
NineteenthCentury Black
107
Work and Gender in the Emergence
121
Taking Every Case to Heart Ruth J Abram
153
For Which Woman Is Preeminently Fitted Ellen J Smith
163
Wide and Fruitful Fields Ellen J Smith
171
Ourselves Your Servants for Jesus Sake
199
Lifted from the Ranks of Mere Pretenders
205
Cordial Social Recognition
213
Part Four
225
The Womens Medical Movement in Decline
231

Part Three
129
The Class of 1879 in Training Ruth J Abram
139
Appendix
247
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