Annual Register, Volume 37

Front Cover
Edmund Burke
1800 - History
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Page 5 - ... of either of the contracting parties, although the whole lading, or any part thereof should appertain to the enemies of either, contraband goods being always excepted.
Page 188 - By the maritime law of nations universally and immemorially received, there is an established method of determination, whether the capture be, or be not, lawful prize. Before the ship or goods can be disposed of by the captor there must be a regular judicial proceeding wherein both parties may be heard, and condemnation thereupon as prize in a Court of Admiralty, judging by the law of nations and treaties. The proper and regular Court for these condemnations is the Court of that state to whom the...
Page 5 - This liberty of navigation and commerce shall extend to all kinds of merchandise, excepting those only which are distinguished by the name of contraband; and under this name of contraband, or prohibited goods, shall be comprehended — 1st. Cannons, mortars, howitzers, swivels, blunderbusses, muskets, rifles, carbines, pistols, pikes, swords...
Page 187 - When two powers are at war, they have a right to make prizes of the ships, goods, and effects of each other, upon the high seas ; whatever is the property of the enemy, may be acquired by capture at sea ; but the property of a friend cannot be taken, provided he observes his neutrality.
Page 5 - ... prepared for war by land or by sea, shall not be reputed contraband, much less such as have been already wrought and made up for any other use : all which shall be wholly reckoned among free goods ; as likewise all other merchandizes and things which are not comprehended and particularly mentioned in the foregoing enumeration of contraband goods...
Page 10 - Orleans, and to export them from thence without paying any other duty than a fair price for the hire of the stores; and his Majesty promises either to continue this permission, if he finds, during that time, that it is not prejudicial to the interests of Spain, or if he should not agree to continue it there, he will assign to them, on another part of the banks of the Mississippi, an equivalent establishment...
Page 6 - States or any of them or against the Property of any of the Inhabitants of any of them from any Prince or State with which the said United States shall be at War.
Page 61 - By these arts, every thing that we perceive or feel, every operation of our minds, is expressed and delineated in such a manner, that it may be clearly distinguished and remembered.
Page 76 - ... of his mind. In this amiable quality, he often recalled to his friends the accounts that are given of good La Fontaine, a quality which in him derived a peculiar grace from the singularity of its combination with those powers of reason and of eloquence which, in his political and moral writings, have long engaged the admiration of Europe.

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