Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice

Front Cover
Nathan Zasler, Douglas Katz, MD, Ross Zafonte, DO
Demos Medical Publishing, 2007 - Medical - 1275 pages
3 Reviews
A Doody's Core Title 2012

Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice is a comprehensive guide to all aspects of the management issues involved in caring for the person with brain injury - from early diagnosis and evaluation through the post-acute period and rehabilitation. It is the definitive core text needed by all practitioners in this area, including physiatrists, neurologists, psychologists, nurses, and other health care professionals.

Written by over 100 acknowledged leaders in the field, and containing hundreds of tables, graphs, and photographic images, the text deals with issues of neuroimaging and neurodiagnostic testing, prognosis and outcome, acute care, rehabilitative care, treatment of specific populations, neurologic problems following injury, neuromusculoskeletal problems, and general management issues.

Key features include:

  • Emphasis on a disease state management approach to patient assessment and treatment
  • Promotion of a holistic, biopsychosocial model of patient assessment and care
  • Review of current expert consensus on practice guidelines
  • Exploration of epidemiologic and basic pathophysiologic aspects of brain injury
  • Examination of clinical issues throughout the continuum of rehabilitative care
  • Cutting edge, practical information based on the authors' extensive clinical experience that will positively impact patients and families following brain injury
"
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Rumination-Pain

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I have not read the whole book yet, but am interested in page 358-9 and your thoughts on TBI and PTSD. I welcome more research into this area where many people get no help, especially at the end of the spectrum, wrongly believed to be mild brain injuries, but where huge hidden problems exist or may not actually be mild at all.
The hidden disability is of course much much worse if coupled with PTSD, but is also much worse to deal with when society does not recognise or see the internalized cognition deficits. I find the views of this book quite concerning however as it is perfectly possible to have brain injury - mild or severe and still have PTSD. Memories can return, after brain injury for the times before the actual bit of being knocked out. If you are in a situation which is prolonged over many months and where you cannot escape from, and especially if you have been knocked out more than once, then some memories and broken memories of the times in between can return, sometimes as long as 3 years after the events. PTSD flashbacks are known to occur many years after the original events and whilst they may have been supressed psychologically, until a poignant trigger presents itself, they could also return as the memories and brain injury improves.
This book uses an example of a bombing incident and something else where people were watching an event and being traumatised from it as opposed to brain injured from it and noting that the PTSD symptoms usually occur straight away. But if you are both traumatized and also brain injured during the months of captivity, then it is not only very possible, but more than likely that you can remember some events that occurred before and after the event that also knocked you unconscious and caused brain injury. The cumulative effects of being knocked unconscious more than once, whether in the same circumstances or different, also need to be considered. For example, If you have been beaten up many times over a space of time from which you are held in captivity or cannot escape for other reasons, then it is perfectly possible to show both TBI and also PTSD.
I feel this book is rather limited in its range of comparisons to PTSD and does not consider real life situations and events that do not get put in the newspapers and do not occur from massed widely experienced events. Regrettably the more common type of injuries that are repeated in circumstances that are not immediately discussed through newspapers still seem to form very little part of the research. It is also known that events where there is a comunity of people to help each other come to terms with the events are less likely to caused PTSD than experiences that happened to an isolated person. If somebody experiences something by themselves, which for many reasons, they cannot share openly even when they reach their relatives, then research already shows that they are more likely to present with PTSD.
If you put that together with the thought that the person may not come into contact with people he knew before the brain injury, for many years to come, then the only people that knew who they were really like before the injury could not see and recognize the signs of brain injury. If the person themselves is brain injured, then they also do not realize their own problems. Therefore presentation to health departments following escape from such traumatic events, or even years after the events, the sudden triggers of memory may result in a PTSD acute phase, but may not even be linked to brain injury for many more years to come.
I can asure you that both TBI (especially if being beaten up also includes substantial movement and force coming in the opposite direction, can be seen in such certain situations and therefore must not be ruled out or the seriousness of both occuring together must not be diminished. I would gladly add to your research if you so wished to contact me.
 

Contents

Douglas I Katz Nathan D Zaslerand Ross D Zafonte
3
Past Present and Future? George A Zitnay
15
Zeev Groswasser and Ofer Keren
21
Margaret A and Turk Joanne Scandale
27
Current Concepts and Issues Amy K Wagner
33
EPIDEMIOLOGY PREVENTION NEUROPATHOLOGY AND NEURAL RECOVERY
43
Implications for Public Health David J Thurman Victor Coronado and Anbesaw Selassie
45
Elena Napolitano Jeffrey Radeckiand Elie P Elovic
57
Nathaniel H Mayer Alberto Esquenazi and Mary Ann E Keenan
615
MEDICAL MANAGEMENT ISSUES
655
Donald F Kirby Linda Creaseyand Souheil G AbouAssi
657
M Elizabeth Sandel Richard Delmonicoand Mary Jean Kotch
673
Medical Assessment and Management Nathan D Zasler Lawrence Horn Michael F Martelli Keith Nicholson
697
Michael F Martelli Keith Nicholsonand Nathan D Zasler
723
From Injury to Recovery Terri Antoinette
743
COGNITIVE AND BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS
763

Pathobiology Patrick M Kochanek Robert SB Clarkand Larry W Jenkins
81
Donald G Stein
97
C Edward Dixon and Anthony E Kline
109
NEUROIMAGING AND NEURODIAGNOSTIC TESTING
127
John M Barkley Denise Morales L Anne Haymanand Pedro J DiazMarchan
129
Joseph H Richer and Patricia M Arenth
149
Evoked Potentials and Electroencephalography Henry L Lew Eun Ha Lee Steven S L Panand Jerry Y P Chiang
157
PROGNOSIS AND OUTCOME
167
A Practical Evidence Based Approach Sunil Kothari
169
Erin D Bigler
201
Marcel Dijkers and Brian Greenwald
225
Robert M Shavelle David J Strauss Steven M Dayand Kelly A Ojdana
247
ACUTE CARE
263
Pathology Pathophysiology Acute Care and Surgical Management Critical Care Principles and Outcomes Eli M Baron and Jack I Jallo
265
W Jerry Mysiw Lisa P Fugateand Daniel M Clinchot
283
REHABILITATIVE CARE AND TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC POPULATIONS
303
A Pediatric Perspective Andrew I Sumich Maureen R Nelsonand James T McDeavitt
305
Jeffrey Englander David X Cifuand Trinh Tran
315
Grant L Iverson Rael T Lange Michael Gaetzand Nathan D Zasler
333
Grant L Iverson Nathan D Zaslerand Rad T Lange
373
Michael W Collins Grant L Iverson Michael Gaetz and Mark R Lovell
407
Joseph T Giacino Douglas I Katzand Nicholas Schiff
423
NEUROLOGIC PROBLEMS
441
Stuart A Yablon and Victor G Dostrow
443
Joachim K Krauss and Joseph Jankovic
469
Neil T Shepard Richard A Clendanieland Michael Ruckenstein
491
William V Padula Lezheng Wu Vincent Vicci John Thomas Christine Nelson Daniel Gottlieb Penelope Suter Thomas Politzerand Raquel Benabib
511
Flora M Hammond and Brent E Masel
529
Assessment and Treatment Jonathan L Fellus and Elie P Elovic
545
Epidemiology Assessment and Treatment Lora L Thaxton and Amish R Patel
557
David F Long
577
NEUROMUSCULOSKELETAL PROBLEMS
603
Kathleen R Bell
605
Keith D Cicerone
765
Paul J Eslinger Giuseppe Zappala Freeman Chakaraand Anna M Barrett
779
Laura A Taylor Lee A Livingstonand Jeffrey S Kreutzer
791
Robert L Karol
815
Thomas W McAllister
835
SPEECH LANGUAGE AND SWALLOWING PROBLEMS
863
Bruce E Murdoch and BrookeMai Whelan
865
Jeri A Logemann
887
Carl A Coelho
895
MOTOR RECOVERY FUNCTIONAL MOBILITY AND ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING
911
Randolph J Nudo and Numa Dancause
913
Katherine J Sullivan
929
Theoretical and Practical Perspectives Robin McNeny
947
NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY AND ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS
961
Jonathan M Silver and David B Arciniegas
963
David B Arciniegas and Jonathan M Silver
995
A Rehabilitation Perspective Jay M Meythaler Ross D Zafonte Lisa Lombardand Cara Camiolo Reddy
1023
Jeffrey S Hecht
1037
Gary G Wang
1051
Jacinta McElligott Alan M Davis Jeffrey S Hecht Sunil Kothari John A Muenz Jrand Gary G Wang
1061
PSYCHOSOCIAL AND VOCATIONAL ISSUES
1083
Sally Kneipp and Allen Rubin
1085
John D Corrigan
1105
Angelle M Sander
1117
Michael West Pam Targett Satoko Yasuda and Paul Wehman
1131
MEDICOLEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES
1149
Irvin V Cantor
1151
Arthur Ameis Nathan D Zasler Michael F Martelliand Shane S Bush
1163
Michael F Martelli Keith Nicholson Nathan D Zaslerand Mark C Bender
1183
Clinical Assessment and Ethical Implications Sunil Kothari and Kristi Kirschner
1205
Clinical and Forensic Issues Roger O Weed and Debra E Berens
1223
Index
1241
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Bibliographic information