Peter Pan

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Plain Label Books, Jan 1, 2010 - Juvenile Fiction - 112 pages
11 Reviews
J.M. Barrie's classic fantasy tale of the boy who would not grow up brings the fairies, mermaids, and lost boys to young readers. When Wendy, John, and Michael follow Peter Pan to the Neverland they encounter the lost boys, Indians, and Captain Hook and his pirates! The incredible adventures with Peter are retold in the Calico Illustrated Classics adaptation of Barrie's Peter Pan. Calico Chapter Books is an imprint of Magic Wagon, a division of ABDO Group. Grades 3-8.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - benuathanasia - LibraryThing

A very good adaption of Peter Pan. It kept all the key scenes and didn't mangle the language too much. The pictures are very typical for the period with nice sift water colours (every other page is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - theresa.moultrie - LibraryThing

Peter Pan enter the home of the Darling's and takes the three children, Wendy, Michael, and John out onto an adventure on a faraway land called Neverland. Peter Pan as long with tinkerbell take the ... Read full review

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Page 72 - Mother! mother!" but she heard him not; in vain he beat his little limbs against the iron bars. He had to fly back, sobbing, to the Gardens, and he never saw his dear again. What a glorious boy he had meant to be to her. Ah, Peter, we who have made the great mistake, how differently we should all act at the second chance. But Solomon was right; there is no second chance, not for most of us. When we reach the window it is Lock-out Time. The iron bars are up for life.
Page 68 - The window was wide open, just as he knew it would be, and in he fluttered, and there was his mother lying asleep. Peter alighted softly on the wooden rail at the foot of the bed and had a good look at her. She lay with her head on her hand, and the hollow in the pillow was like a nest lined with her brown wavy hair. He remembered, though he had long forgotten it, that she always gave her hair a holiday at night. How sweet the frills of her nightgown were! He was very glad she was such a pretty mother....
Page 56 - ... in 290 or 398 as children use these books solely for the story interest and not at all as a study of mythology or folklore. It may be well in some instances to keep books of this character grouped together for convenience but their use should be recorded as a part of the fiction circulation. " It is frightfully difficult to know much about the fairies and almost the only thing known for certain is there are fairies wherever there are children.
Page 63 - But there is also a way of finding out about the ball before it takes place. You know the boards which tell at what time the Gardens are to close today. Well, these tricky fairies sometimes slyly change the board on a ball night, so that it says the Gardens are to close at six-thirty, for instance, instead of at seven. This enables them to get begun half an hour earlier. If on such a night we could remain behind in the Gardens, as the famous Maimie Mannering did, we might see delicious sights; hundreds...
Page 11 - Solomon said, and certainly he was a wise old fellow, for that is exactly how it turned out. The birds on the island never got used to him. His oddities tickled them every day, as if they were quite new, though it was really the birds that were new. They...
Page 72 - I wish now to go back to mother for ever and always," they had to tickle his shoulder and let him go. He went in a hurry in the end because he had dreamt that his mother was crying, and he knew what was the great thing she cried for, and that a hug from her splendid Peter would quickly make her to smile. Oh, he felt sure of it, and so eager was he to be nestling in her arms that this time he flew straight to the window, which was always to be open for him. But the window was closed, and there were...
Page 63 - ... the cloakroom where they put on their silver slippers and get a ticket for their wraps, the flowers streaming up from the Baby Walk to look on, and always welcome because they can lend a pin, the supper-table, with Queen Mab at the head of it, and behind her chair the Lord Chamberlain, who carries a dandelion on which he blows when her Majesty wants to know the time.
Page 60 - When the first baby laughed for the first time, his laugh broke into a million pieces, and they all went skipping about. That was the origin of fairies.
Page 51 - ... round her,' they cried, and at once everybody perceived that this was the thing to do ; in a moment a hundred fairy sawyers were among the branches, architects were running round Maimie, measuring her ; a bricklayer's yard sprang up at her feet, seventy-five masons rushed up with the foundation-stone, and the Queen laid it, overseers were appointed to keep the boys off, scaffoldings were run up, the whole place rang with hammers and chisels and turning-lathes, and by this time the roof was on...
Page 72 - He went in a hurry in the end because he had dreamt that his mother was crying, and he knew what was the great thing she cried for, and that a hug from her splendid Peter would quickly make her to smile. Oh, he felt sure of it, and so eager was he to be nestling in her arms that this time he flew straight to the window, which was always to be open for him. But the window was closed, and there were iron bars on it, and peering inside he saw his mother sleeping peacefully with her arm round another...

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About the author (2010)

Lisa Mullarkey grew up near the beach and spent many summers at the shore with her family. She lives in Hillsborough, New Jersey.

Sir James Mathew Barrie was born on May 9, 1860, at Kirriemuir in Scotland, the ninth of ten children of a weaver. When Barrie was six, his older brother David died in a skating accident. Barrie then became his mother's chief comforter, while David remained in her memory a boy of thirteen who would never grow up. Barrie received his M.A. degree from the University of Edinburgh in 1882 and began working as a journalist. In 1885 he moved to London, and his writings were collected in "Auld Licht Idlls" (1888) and "A Window in Thurns" (1889), which, together with a sentimental novel, "The Little Minister" (1891), made him a best-selling author. In 1894 he married an actress, Mary Ansell, but the marriage was profoundly unhappy, produced no children, and was dissolved in 1910. However, a favorite Saint Bernard dog of Mary's later became the famous Nana of Peter Pan. In 1897, with the adaptation of "The Little Minister," Barrie became a successful playwright, writing the plays" The Admirable Crichton "(1902), "What Every Woman Knows" (1903), and Peter Pan (1904), which was produced in 1904 and revived in London every Christmas season thereafter. While the figure of Peter Pan first appeared in Barrie's book "The Little White Bird" (1902), the story and the concept began in the tales Barrie told the sons of Mrs. Sylvia Llewelyn Davies, a woman Barrie loved. Barrie then published the story of Peter Pan in book form as "Peter and Wendy" (1911). The best of Barrie's later works is" Dear Brutus" (1917), a haunting play that again brought the supernatural and fantasy to the London stage. Barrie died in 1937, bequeathing the copyright of "Peter Pan" to the Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, ahospital for children.

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