A Journal of American Ethnology and Archæology: Hopi songs, by B.I. Gilman

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Jesse Walter Fewkes
Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1908 - Hemenway Southwestern Archaeological Expedition
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Page 22 - ... Polynesian singing, or at least for a great part of it. The singer's musical consciousness seems restricted to a few intervals of simplest vibration ratio approximately rendered, and to melodic sequences formed by their various analysis and synthesis and rendered with a certain loose fidelity. . . . Such exactness as the songs possess does not lie in the individual intervals which constantly vary and are often exchanged, but in the course of the melodies which sometimes coincide precisely in...
Page 240 - Contributions to the History of the Southwestern Portion of the United States, in Papers of the Archaeological Institute of America, American Series, V.
Page 25 - ... larger shift of about a semitone, which may affect any of the notes of a phrase, and which is illustrated in almost all of the melodies; and a smaller and less frequent shift of about a quarter tone, affecting only notes whose central position or office as starting points distinguishes them as axes or bases. The larger mutation may be spoken of as compound or simple according as the shift occurs in both senses about such a cardinal note, or moves all the notes affected in the same sense. Simple...
Page 25 - The partial change in the pitch of repeated phrases, which has already been seen to resist explanation by modulation, is the most noteworthy formal feature of this music. . . . The change is of two kinds: a larger shift of about a semitone, which may affect any of the notes of a phrase, and which is illustrated in almost all of the melodies; and a smaller and less frequent shift of about a quarter tone, affecting only notes whose central position or office as starting points distinguishes them as...
Page 16 - The step taken is no other than that separating the indicative from the imperative mood, the real from the ideal. Written music as otherwise known is not a record of occurrence but of purpose.
Page xi - Moqui, singing, to which this volume is devoted, completes an inquiry into Pueblo music begun in 1891 with a study of Zuñi Melodies.1 The records upon which both investigations have been based were obtained in Arizona by Dr.
Page 17 - ... being in itself an argument against the possession of any scale-consciousness by the singers.
Page 13 - If a scale were in his mind, even dimly, it should make itself known in a more uniform interval production and in a more impartial use Of the tones continually at hand in the fancy. The hearer seems witness to a wholly strange method of musical thought and delivery. The total complex of tone, timbre, and articulation —doubtless at times movements, and other noises...
Page 35 - He grasped the distinction between the notation of a performance, which he believed only possible through the use of an objective mechanical device such as the phonograph, and the notation of a piece of music, the result of taking down by ear, which is "a record of the observer's idea of what the performers of certain observed sequences of tone would have performed had their execution corresponded to their intention, or (perhaps) had their intention not wandered also from a certain norm
Page 74 - A Kwakiutl Indian, whose performance before a phonograph I once heard through Dr. Boas's kindness, sheepish as was his air before beginning, when once buried in his song crooned away as simply and unhesitatingly...

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