Anthem

Front Cover
Pamphleteers, 1946 - Individualism - 98 pages
1770 Reviews
He lived in the dark ages of the future. In a loveless world he dared to love the woman of his choice. In an age that had lost all trace of science and civilization he had the courage to seek and find knowledge. But these were not the crime for which he would be hunted. He was marked for death because he had committed the unpardonable sin: he had stood forth from the mindless human herd. He was a man alone. Ayn Rand's classic tale of a future dark age of the great We -- in which individuals have no name, no independence, and no values -- anticipates her later masterpieces, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.

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5 stars
441
4 stars
535
3 stars
417
2 stars
215
1 star
162

A good quick read I liked the pacing of this novella. - Goodreads
Rand is a shitty writer. - Goodreads
I love the imagery in this book. - Goodreads
The prose elevated men but neglected others. - Goodreads
A love story set in a world without personality. - Goodreads
Good introduction to Ayn's philosophy. - Goodreads

Review: Anthem

User Review  - Caroline Kelemen - Goodreads

I don't think this book is as controversial as its reputation. This is not a good book for people looking for a good story. It's simplisticly written, but the point is the philosophy, not the ... Read full review

Review: Anthem

User Review  - Tom Torkelson - Goodreads

3 stars is a stretch. This is like being asked to rate a textbook. Don't expect a real plot, or any characters you can connect with. I would only recommend this one to someone before they read Atlas ... Read full review

All 17 reviews »

About the author (1946)

Ayn Rand, 1905 - 1982 Novelist and philosopher Ayn Rand was born Alice Rosenbaum on February 2, 1905 in St. Petersburg, Russia. She graduated with highest honors in history from the University of Petrograd in 1924, and she came to the United States in 1926 with dreams of becoming a screenwriter. In 1929, she married actor Charles "Frank" O'Connor. After arriving in Hollywood, Rand was spotted by Cecil B. DeMille standing at the gate of his studio and gave her a job as an extra in King of Kings. She also worked as a script reader and a wardrobe girl and, in 1932, she sold Red Pawn to Universal Studios. In the 1950's, she returned to New York City where she hosted a Saturday night group she called "the collective." It was also during this time that Rand received a fan letter from a young man, Nathaniel Branden. She was impressed with his letter, and she wrote him back. Her correspondence with him eventually led to an affair that lasted over a decade. He became her chief spokesperson and codified the principles of her novels into a strict philosophical system (objectivism) and founded an institute bearing his name. Their affair ended in 1968 when Branden got involved with another one of Rand's disciples. According to Rand, people are inherently selfish and act only out of personal interest making a selfish act, a rational one. It is from this belief that her characters play out their lives. Rand's first novel was "We the Living" (1936) and was followed by "Anthem" (1938), "The Fountainhead" (1943), and "Atlas Shrugged" (1957). All four of her novels made the top ten of the controversial list of the 100 Best Novels of the 20th Century. On March 6, 1982, Ayn Rand died in her New York City apartment.

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