Parnassus on Wheels

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Doubleday, Page, 1917 - Booksellers and bookselling - 190 pages
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User Review  - unclebob53703 - LibraryThing

Fun story with an irresistible protagonist, told from the point of view of a lady who falls in love with him, and suffused with a love of books and reading. The sequel, The Haunted Bookshop, is better still. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Rosa.Mill - LibraryThing

What a cute, funny little love story. I loved Helen and Roger and I'm very excited to find out that this is a sort of prequel and I get to read more about them. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
3
II
12
III
23
IV
33
V
52
VI
70
VII
84
VIII
96
IX
114
X
123
XI
140
XII
153
XIII
164
XIV
175
XV
186
Copyright

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Page 137 - I should (said he) Bestow this jewel also on my creature, He would adore my gifts instead of me, And rest in Nature, not the God of Nature : So both should losers be. Yet let him keep the rest, But keep them with repining restlessness : Let him be rich and weary, that at least, If goodness lead him not, yet weariness May toss him to my breast.
Page 136 - There are three ingredients in the good life: learning, earning, and yearning. A man should be learning as he goes; and he should be earning bread for himself and others; and he should be yearning, too: yearning to know the unknowable. What a fine old poem is "The Pulley
Page 39 - when you sell a man a book you don't sell him just twelve ounces of paper and ink and glue — you sell him a whole new life. Love and friendship and humour and ships at sea by night — there's all heaven and earth in a book, a real book I mean.
Page 39 - ... ink and glue — you sell him a whole new life. Love and friendship and humor and ships at sea by night — there's all heaven and earth in a book, a real book I mean. Jiminy! If I were the baker or the butcher or the broom huckster, people would run to the gate when I came by — just waiting for my stuff. And here I go loaded with everlasting salvation — yes, ma'am, salvation for their little, stinted minds — and it's hard to make 'em see it. That's what...
Page 65 - New York is Babylon; Brooklyn is the true Holy City. New York is the city ofenvy, qfl1ce work and hustle; Brooklyn is the region of homes and happiness.
Page 13 - It was coloured a pale, robin's-egg blue, and on the side, in big scarlet letters, was painted : R. MIFFLIN'S TRAVELLING PARNASSUS GOOD BOOKS FOR SALE SHAKESPEARE, CHARLES LAMB, RLS HAZLITT, AND ALL OTHERS...
Page 66 - There is no hope for New Yorkers, for they glory in their skyscraping sins; but in Brooklyn there is the wisdonv of the lowly.
Page 39 - If I were the baker or the butcher or the broom huckster, people would run to the gate when I came by — just waiting for my stuff. And here I go loaded with everlasting salvation — yes, ma'am, salvation for their little, stinted minds — and it's hard to make 'em see it. That's what makes it worth while — I'm doing something that nobody else from Nazareth, Maine, to Walla Walla, Washington, has ever thought of. It's a new field, but by the bones of Whitman, it's worth while. That's what this...
Page 38 - He was a kind of traveling missionary in his way. A hefty talker, too. His eyes were twinkling now and I could see him warming up. "Lord!" he said, "when you sell a man a book you don't just sell him twelve ounces of paper and ink and glue — you sell him a whole new life. Love and friendship and humor and ships at sea by night — there's all heaven and earth in a book, a real book I mean, Jiminy! If I were the baker or the butcher or the broom huckster, people would run to the...
Page 137 - ... to shatter this sorry scheme of things and " then remould it nearer to the heart's desire," to indulge in other words the romantic type of imagination.

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