Elements of South-Indian Palæography, from the Fourth to the Seventeenth Century, A. D.: Being an Introduction to the Study of South-Indian Inscriptions and Mss

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Trübner & Company, 1878 - Inscriptions - 147 pages
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Page 55 - King in prison, it was their use euery yeere once to show him to the people, and they at their pleasures ruled as they listed. These brethren were three Captaines belonging to the father of the King they kept in prison, which when he died, left his sonne very young, and then they tooke the
Page 4 - The Aryans invented no alphabet of their own for their special form of human speech, but were, in all their migrations, indebted to the nationality amid whom they settled for their instruction in the science of writing:
Page 39 - The development of the early stages of the Grantha character is very difficult to trace, for the reason that the N. Indian civilization, when it got as far down in the peninsula as the Tamil country, found there a people already in possession of the art of writing, and apparently a cultivated language
Page 71 - entre Moultan et le chateau de Louny. Cette epoque devint celebre a cause de la joie que les peuples ressentirent de la mort de Saca, et on la choisit pour
Page 6 - It would seem to me that it denotes the writing of the Persians, and probably the cuneiform writing which was already known, before the time of Darius, and is peculiar enough in its appearance, and different enough from the alphabet of the
Page 55 - thirty yeares was this Kingdome governed by three brethren which were Tyrants, the which keeping the rightful! King in prison, it was their use
Page 91 - countries began to erect viharas for the priesthood and to endow them with lands, gardens, houses, and also men and oxen to cultivate them. The records of these endowments, being engraved on sheets of copper, have been handed down from one king to another, so that no one has dared to deprive them of possession, and they continue to this day to enjoy their proper revenues
Page 91 - being engraved on sheets of copper, have been handed down from one king to another, so that no one has dared to deprive them of possession, and they continue to this day to enjoy their proper revenues
Page 117 - indicate that the earliest form of communal property (in which the common land was cultivated by all the owners in common who divided the produce") had already become uncommon; for, though townships
Page 4 - provinces out of a very archaic type (! ?) of Phoenician, and whose graphic efficiency was so singularly aided by the free use of birch bark.

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