Insects: their structure & life

Front Cover
J.M. Dent, 1899 - Entomology - 404 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 128 - The tiny cell is forlorn, Void of the little living will That made it stir on the shore. Did he stand at the diamond door Of his house in a rainbow frill ? Did he push, when he was uncurl'd, A golden foot or a fairy horn Thro
Page 294 - ... adapted to life in the water. The grub of the gnat or the drone-fly needs to rise to the surface at intervals and pierce the film with its air-tube in order to get a fresh supply of oxygen. But the pupa of the sand-midge, with its tubular gill-filaments, or the larva of a May-fly with its tracheal gillplates, can remain in the water throughout its life, drawing, as do the fishes, sufficient oxygen from the dissolved air. It is interesting to notice that within the limits of a single and restricted...
Page 294 - Flies can be seen hovering over the seaweed cast up by the tide. These have been developed from grubs which live and feed in the decaying weed, and are able to bear immersion twice daily. Around the rockpools many Midges may be noticed. Their grubs feed on growing green seaweed, and spend their whole life in the salt water, breathing the dissolved air, as do their fresh-water relations, by means of gill-filaments, or simply through the surface of the skin. Many species of Beetles inhabit the shore,...
Page 288 - Les colonies de vacances' (Paris 1908) ; Allen, 'Sea Air Treatment for New York's Bedridden Children' (in Review of Reviews, Vol. XXXII, New York 1905). FRESH-WATER INSECTS. Insects are essentially creatures of the air and the land; yet a considerable number pass the whole or the greater part of their lives in rivers, lakes and ponds. Among insects aquatic in all stages we can distinguish between those which glide or skate over the surface of the water, diving not at all, or only exceptionally, and...
Page 290 - ... diving-beetles," belong to the group of insects which live habitually submerged. Their contours are admirably adapted for motion through the water, but there is no dense hairy covering to ensure the formation of an air-bubble and the breathing is provided for in quite another way. The abdominal spiracles open on the upper surface of the segments, which are completely covered by the wing-cases when the wings are shut. The wing-cases being convex and the upper surface of the abdomen depressed,...
Page vi - When ye glorify the Lord, exalt him as much as ye can ; for even yet will he exceed : and when ye exalt him, put forth your full strength : be not weary ; for ye will never attain.
Page 289 - ... New York's Bedridden Children' (in Review of Reviews, Vol. XXXII, New York 1905). FRESH-WATER INSECTS. Insects are essentially creatures of the air and the land; yet a considerable number pass the whole or the greater part of their lives in rivers, lakes and ponds. Among insects aquatic in all stages we can distinguish between those which glide or skate over the surface of the water, diving not at all, or only exceptionally, and those which habitually dive and swim through the water after the...
Page 292 - The families of insects nearly related to these have larvœ which live in mud and damp earth, and this suggests that it was from the shores that the waters were invaded by these insect-hosts. But there is another division of aquatic larvae still more perfectly adapted to life in the water. The grub of the gnat or the drone-fly needs to rise to the surface at intervals and pierce the film with its air-tube in order to get a fresh supply of oxygen. But the pupa of the sand-midge, with its tubular gill-filaments,...
Page 294 - ... surface, breathes through them after the manner of an imago. These various adaptations to an aquatic life within a single group indicate clearly that the habit of living in water is not primitive among insects, but that it has become acquired by different races at different times in the course of the development. It may be presumed that larvae with the more perfect adaptations for breathing when submerged — leaf-like or thread-like gills — are older inhabitants of the water than those which...

Bibliographic information