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" No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, but... "
the american annual cyclopaedia - Page 340
1863
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Elements of international law: with a sketch of the history of the science

Henry Wheaton - Law - 1836
...sanctioned by universal assent, every nation had an equal right to engage. No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality...can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent of all, could be divested only by consent; and this trade, in which...
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Enquiry Into the Validity of the British Claim: To a Right of Visitation ...

Henry Wheaton - Search, Right of - 1842 - 175 pages
...sanctioned by universal consent, every nation had an equal right to engage. No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality...can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent of all, could be divested only by consent ; and this trade, in which...
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Institutes of International Law, Volume 1

Richard Wildman - International law - 1849
...this renunciation effect others? No principle of public law is (n) 10 Wheaton, 120. more generally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations....rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightly impose a rule upon another. Each legislates for itself, but its legislation can affect itself...
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The American Annual Cyclopędia and Register of Important Events ...

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1863
...lost ? Each may renounce it for its own people ; but can this renunciation affect others? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than...rights. It results from this equality that no one can rightfullv impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself* but its legislation can operate on...
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The Trial of Hon. Clement L. Vallandigham: By a Military Commission: and the ...

Habeas corpus - 1863 - 272 pages
...Antelope, (10 Wheaton, 66, 67,) no nation can add to, or subtract from, the general law of nations. " Each legislates for itself; but its legislation can operate on itself alone." (P. 122.) Does it follow, from what I have said, that the government of the United States can not subdue...
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Elements of International Law

Henry Wheaton - Foreign relations - 1866 - 749 pages
...sanctioned by universal assent, every nation had an equal right to engage. No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality...impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, hut its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent...
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On International Reform

Frederic Seebohm - Commerce - 1871 - 147 pages
...Supreme Court of the United States adopted the same conclusion :— ' No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality...that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. ... A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent of all could be divested only by consent....
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Fur Seal Arbitration: Proceedings of the Tribunal of Arbitration ..., Volume 4

Bering Sea controversy - 1895
...acknowledged Wheat™, Rethan the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva have PJf'- vo1- 10> Pequal rights. It results from this equality, that no one...Each legislates for itself, but its legislation can operateon itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all by the consent of all, can bo devested...
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Fur Seal Arbitration: Proceedings of the Tribunal of Arbitration ..., Volume 4

Bering Sea controversy - 1895
...Geneva have P"J*' vo1- w> Vequal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can right- " ' fully impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, but its legislation can operate oil itself alone. A right, then, which is vested iu all by the consent of all, can bo devested only...
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Transactions, Volume 15

Maryland State Bar Association - 1910
...nations. In passing, it is of interest to observe that in the same case Marshall said, "No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations," thus stating the doctrine which was slowly gathering strength in Grotius' time, but which might have...
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