Managing the Environment, Managing Ourselves: A History of American Environmental Policy

Front Cover
Yale University Press, Jan 1, 1999 - Political Science - 463 pages
American environmental policy is not just a product of late twentieth-century concerns about the environment, says Richard Andrews in this important book. It is also rooted in America's nearly four-hundred-year history of government actions to promote or control human uses of nature. This book tells that rich history & shows how it affects environmental issues today & in the future. Andrews traces the interplay between environmental policies & broader patterns of economic, social, & political history, & he shows not only what is unique about recent environmental policy but also how it emerged from earlier patterns & precedents. Andrews explores enduring questions about the nature & implications of American environmental governance, then sums up the legacy of American environmental policy & poses its central challenges.
 

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Contents

Environment and Governance
1
European Colonization and Trade
14
Environment as Property
28
The Constitutional Framework
51
Commercial Development as Environmental
71
Public Health and Urban Sanitation
109
Conservation in the Public Interest
136
Subgovernments and Stakeholders
154
The Rise of Modern Environmentalism
201
I2 Nationalizing Pollution Control
227
Reform or Reaction? The Politics of the Pendulum
255
The Unfinished Business of National Environmental Policy
284
Chronology
373
Notes
395
References
433
Index
453

IO Superpower and Supermarket
179

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