Yukon: The Last Frontier

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UBC Press, 1993 - History - 416 pages
1 Review
Covering vast distances in time and space, Yukon: The Last Frontier begins with the early Russian fur trade on the Aleutian Islands and closes with what Melody Webb calls 'the technological frontier'. Colourful and impeccably researched, her history of the Yukon Basin of Canada and Alaska shows how much and how little has changed there in the last two centuries. Successive waves of traders, trappers, miners, explorers, soldiers, missionaries, settlers, steamboat pilots, road builders, and aviators have come to the Yukon, bringing economic and social changes, but the immense land 'remains virtually untouched by permanent intrusions.'
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - untraveller - LibraryThing

Mediocre writing at best. Did not seem engaged in what she was writing about and, honestly, I could have picked virtually any book about the Yukon and gotten more wrapped up in the subject. The material is fascinating....Webb's style is not. Read full review

Contents

A Setting for Successive Frontiers
1
The Russian and English Frontiers
21
The Traders Frontier
51
Fortymile and Circle
77
The Explorers Frontier
99
The Klondike Frontier and Its Backwash
123
The Soldiers Frontier
143
The Missionarys and Settlers Frontier
171
Riverways
205
Trails and Roads
225
Railways
247
The TwentiethCentury Miners Frontier
269
The Enduring Frontier
291
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About the author (1993)

Melody Webb, who spent time in the Yukon wildernessbefore writing this book, is the assistant superintendent of TetonNational Park.

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