A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge ...

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Hackett Publishing, 1982 - Philosophy - 105 pages

Kenneth Winkler's esteemed edition of Berkeley's Principles is based on the second edition (London, 1734), the last one published in Berkeley's lifetime.

Life other members of Hackett's philosophical classics series, it features editorial elements found to be of particular value to students and their teachers: analytical table of contents; chronology of the author's life; selected bibliography; note on the text; glossary; and index.

 

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Contents

Dedicatory Epistle
3
The distinction between primary and secondary qualities 915
9
Primary qualities cannot be conceived apart from
10
the notion of matter is either empty
16
Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part I
23
How are ideas caused? 2533
25
But God is the cause of ideas of sense He produces
34
It is hard to believe the whole world is mistaken 5455
54
If immaterialism is true the complexity of plants
66
Objections on the part of religion 8284
82
Useless questions banished
85
Glossary
89
Matter is the main support of atheism and fatalism 9296
92
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Page xlii - I acknowledge it does so, the word idea not being used in common discourse to signify the several combinations of sensible qualities, which are called things: and it is certain that any expression which varies from the familiar use of language, will seem harsh and ridiculous. But this doth not concern the truth of the proposition, which in other words is no more than to say, we are fed and clothed with those things which we perceive immediately by our senses.

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