The Awakening

Front Cover
Independently Published, Oct 15, 2019 - 110 pages

A new, beautifully laid-out, easy-to-read edition of Kate Chopin's timeless classic.


Kate Chopin's The Awakening is the story of Edna Pontellier and her struggle between her increasingly unorthodox views on femininity and motherhood with the prevailing attitudes of the American South at the start of the 20th century.

Originally published in 1899, Kate Chopin's masterpiece is considered to be a landmark work of early feminism, as well as a precursor of American modernist literature. It is also considered to be among the first contributions to the "Southern" tradition of American literature, prefiguring the works of Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Katherine Anne Porter, and Tennessee Williams.

Kate Chopin (1850-1904) was an American author of short stories and novels based in Lousiana. She is considered by some scholars to be one of the forerunners of 20th century feminist literature.

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About the author (2019)

Kate Chopin was born Katherine O'Flaherty in St. Louis, Missouri, on February 8, 1851. Although she was brought up in a wealthy and socially elite Catholic family, Chopin's childhood was marred by tragedies. Her father was killed in a train accident when Chopin was just four years old, and in the following years she also lost her older brother, great-grandmother, and half-brother. In 1870, at the age of 19, she married Oscar Chopin, the son of a wealthy cotton-growing family in Louisiana. The couple had seven children together, five boys and two girls, before Oscar died of swamp fever in 1883. The following year, Chopin packed up her family and moved back to St. Louis to be with her mother, who died just a year later. To support herself and her family, Chopin started to write. Her first novel, At Fault, was published in 1890. Her most famous work, The Awakening, inspired by a real-life New Orleans woman who committed adultery, was published in 1899. The book explores the social and psychological consequences of a woman caught in an unhappy marriage in 19th century America, is now considered a classic of the feminist movement and caused such an uproar in the community that Chopin almost entirely gave up writing. Chopin did try her hand at a few short stories, most of which were not even published. Chopin died on August 22, 1904, of a brain hemorrhage, after collapsing at the World's Fair just two days before.

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