Personal Beauty and Racial Betterment

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C.V. Mosby Company, 1920 - Beauty, Personal - 85 pages
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Page 97 - This book is a preservation photocopy. It was produced on Hammermill Laser Print natural white, a 60 # book weight acid-free archival paper which meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (permanence of paper) Preservation photocopying and binding by Acme Bookbinding Charlestown, Massachusetts CD 1995 The borrower must return this item on or before the last date stamped below.
Page 40 - The most important element in the beauty of any individual," says Dr. Dunlap, "is the evidence of her (or his) fitness for the function of procreating healthy children of the highest type of efficiency, according to the standards of the race; and ability to protect these children." To illustrate this — he can not be said to prove it, since his book is entirely lacking in statistical treatment — he discusses traits of race, signs of disease, deformity or weakness, significant deviation from the...
Page 49 - Although our survey is far from complete, it has proceeded far enough to show us clearly in what beauty consists. It is the sign and the expression of the potentiality of the individual; not what he has done or is doing, but what he is capable of doing; not what he is capable of doing for his own interests, but what he is capable of doing for the species. Put in the plainest of terms, the most beautiful woman, the handsomest man, are the persons we would choose to be coparents of our children, if...
Page 29 - The simplest explanation for the accepted ideal of form would be that it is the average form of the healthy individual. This explanation, I think, is not supportable. Among the Greeks and Romans, for example, the ideal ankle, for a woman at least, was a small ankle, not a medium-sized one. Among us, a small foot has been desirable; so much so that women have been compelled to wear shoes which, by raising the heel several inches, make the ground-base of the shoe about two thirds the real length of...
Page 38 - ... those structural and functional changes which are evidenced in the tendencies of feeling and action distinctive of the male. If the glands are removed in infancy, these changes do not occur. The secretions of the ovaries, on the other hand, seem to inhibit the growth of bodyhair, to accelerate those structural changes in the muscles, glands and skeleton which differentiate the woman from the man, and promote those functional modifications which make the feelings and emotions of each sex a sealed...
Page 95 - I have attempted to show that such conservation is not to be sought primarily through comprehensive governmental direction, nor legal restrictions; nor by blind adherence to the protective regulations of the past, however admirable these may have been. Laws, conventions, and economic conditions should be so shaped as to facilitate conservation, instead of hindering it; but this shaping, and the still greater work...
Page 52 - ... to the individual no longer potential for the race. This consideration, perhaps, has not increased since patriarchal times, but it is an advance over the attitude of still more primitive races amongst whom the individual who is no longer useful as a warrior or a parent is ignored or eliminated. Finally, I must refer to the popular distinction between...
Page 12 - ... Betterment. By KNIGHT DUNLAP, Professor of Experimental Psychology in The Johns Hopkins University. $I. (St. Louis: CV Mosby Company, 1920.) In contrast with the above this book is live and forceful. " The first part of this essay consists, with some additions, of an address delivered in April, 1917, before the Association of Physical Directors of Women's Colleges, the Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology, and the Faculty and students of Randolph-Macon College, at Lynchburg, Va.
Page 11 - WORLD reducible to two main points: (1) that he makes the procreation of children the predominant ideal in marriage, minimizing companionship and other "spiritual...
Page 38 - ... development is not associated with sexual ripening in a chance way, but is controlled by the fundamental sex glands. These glands not only produce the germ cells (the egg and the spermatozoon) whose union creates the life of a new individual; they secrete also, into the blood stream, hormones, i. c..

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