Injurious Insects of the Orchard, Vineyard, Field, Garden, Conservatory, Household, Storehouse, Domestic Animals, Etc: With Remedies for Their Extermination

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H.S. Crocker & Company, printers, 1883 - Beneficial insects - 472 pages
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Page 120 - Genus CEROPLASTES The species belonging to this genus are furnished with a thick covering of waxy material, which does not, however, adhere closely to the insect. This covering is formed of layers secreted by the spinnerets. Some of the species have tuberosities upon the back which are larger or smaller according to the age of the insect, and which entirely disappear at full growth, when, from being more or less flat with tuberosities or nuclei with concentric lines, they become smooth and globular....
Page 124 - ... margin of body of young and of female in all stages fringed with tubular spinnerets, which are covered with a waxy excretion; adult male with single ocellus behind each eye, and a pair of bristles on each side of penultimate abdominal segment, each pair supporting a long white filament excreted by numerous pores at its base. The fully developed female makes a dense sac of waxy matter within which the eggs are laid and the shriveled body of the insect remains; the full-grown male larva makes a...
Page 130 - Take two pieces of stout brass wire, each about 20 inches long ; bend them half-circularly and join at one end by a folding hinge having a check on one side (b). The other ends are bent and beaten into two square sockets (/) which fit to a nut sunk and soldered into one end of a brass tube (d). When so fitted, they are secured by a large-headed screw (e) threaded to fit into the nut-socket, and with a groove wide enough to receive the back of a common...
Page 131 - ... them will flow evenly over the whole surface and join them firmly together. Take a Maynard rifle cartridge tube, or other brass tube of similar dimensions ; if the former, file off the closed end or perforate it for the admission of the wire, and having tinned it in the same manner on the...
Page 23 - The body of the perfect insect (Fig. 86) is composed of three parts, the head, the thorax, and the abdomen. THE HEAD AND ITS APPENDAGES.
Page 136 - ... against the wall. In about a fortnight I was annoyed to see its antennae cut off, the head and thorax denuded of most of their down, and some large holes made in the abdomen. After some consideration, I placed a gallipot, containing about 25 grains of cyanide of potassa roughly bruised, with a very little water, in the bottom of the case. I then introduced six drops of sulphuric acid, and let down the glass. In less than a minute I had the satisfaction of seeing a fine, stout Dermestes larva...
Page 125 - Antennae of the larvae 6-jointed with a very long pubescence, and with four hairs upon the last joint much longer than the others. Lateral lobes of the extremity of the abdomen with a series of three very long, frequently interlaced bristles.
Page 118 - C. ortliolobix), with the sides parallel, and the larval skin at the anterior end. The last segment of the female presents five groups of spinnerets. This genus resembles Diaspis in the, form of the scale of the male and Mytilaspis in the form of the scale of the female; in most species, however, the scale of the female is wider than in Mytilaspis.
Page 120 - Genus Uhleria Comstock. This genus includes species of Diaspinae in which upon the scale of the female only one larval skin is visible at the cephalic extremity; the second skin is present, but it is entirely covered by secretion. This skin is large, covering the insect entirely, The scale is narrow at its cephalic end; it soon widens, and the sides are parallel throughout the greater part of its length. The three cephalic groups of spinnerets...
Page 124 - Antennae of larvae and of the adult female 7-jointed; ano-genital ring with eight hairs; tarsi of both male and female each with four digitales; margin of body of young and of female in all stages fringed with tubular spinnerets, which are covered with a waxy excretion; adult male with single ocellus behind each eye, and a pair of bristles on each side of penultimate abdominal segment, each pair supporting a long white filament excreted...

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