No Man Is an Island

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct 28, 2002 - Religion - 290 pages
The classic collection of essays for those seeking spiritual wisdom from the religious scholar, Trappist monk, and author of The Seven Storey Mountain.
 
A recapitulation of his earlier work Seeds of Contemplation, this collection of sixteen essays plumbs aspects of human spirituality. Merton addresses those in search of enduring values, fulfillment, and salvation in prose that is, as always, inspiring and compassionate. “A stimulating series of spiritual reflections which will prove helpful for all struggling to find the meaning of human existence and to live the richest, fullest, and noblest life” (Chicago Tribune).

Praise for Thomas Merton

“He is perhaps the proper patron saint of our information-saturated age, of we who live and move and have our being in social media, and then, desperate for peace and rest, withdraw into privacy and silence, only to return. As we always will.”—The New Yorker
 
“Merton wrote of ageless spiritual life and religious devotion with the knowledge of a modern.”—The New York Times
 
“It is undoubtedly one of the most significant accounts of conversion from the modern temper to God that our time has seen.”—America Magazine on The Seven Storey Mountain

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pdever - LibraryThing

I found it to be interesting, but also a fairly difficult book...partly because it was written for an audience of religious people (e.g., his fellow brothers), but also because it requires a deeper ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nmele - LibraryThing

First published in the mid-1950s, this book of reflections will occasionally require some deciphering since the language is that of the Roman Catholic Church before Vatican II and therefore a bit ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Thomas Merton (1915-1968) was born in France and came to live in the United States at the age of 24. He received several awards recognizing his contribution to religious study and contemplation, including the Pax Medal in 1963, and remained a devoted spiritualist and a tireless advocate for social justice until his death in 1968. The Sign of Jonas was originally published in 1953.

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