Pragmatism as a Principle and Method of Right Thinking: The 1903 Harvard Lectures on Pragmatism

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1997 - Philosophy - 305 pages
A study edition of Peirce's manuscripts for lectures on pragmatism given in spring 1903 at Harvard University, with notes, preface, and an original introduction by the editor introducing Peirce and interpreting Peirce's thinking for a more general readership.

 

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Contents

LECTURE ONE
23
LECTURE TWO
37
LECTURE THREE
49
LECTURE FOUR
59
LECTURE FIVE
65
LECTURE SIX
77
LECTURE SEVEN
89
PRAGMATISM AS A PRINCIPLE AND METHOD OF RIGHT THINKING
107
PHENOMENOLOGY OR THE DOCTRINE OF CATEGORIES PART A MATHEMATICS AS A BASIS OF LOGIC DRAFT ONE
123
THE CATEGORIES DEFENDED
167
THE SEVEN SYSTEMS OF METAPHYSICS
189
THE NORMATIVE SCIENCES
205
THE NATURE OF MEANING
221
THREE COTARY PROPOSITIONS OF PRAGMATISM
241
Notes
257
INDEX
287

INTRODUCTION
109

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About the author (1997)

Charles Sanders Peirce was the son of the eminent mathematician and Harvard professor Benjamin Peirce. The young Peirce attended Harvard University, where he studied science, mathematics, and philosophy. For 30 years he worked for the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Because of personal difficulties---he was overbearing and eccentric---he taught only briefly as a lecturer at Harvard (1864-65, 1869-71) and at Johns Hopkins University (1879--84). He wrote no books and published very little during his lifetime, mostly articles and encyclopedia entries, but many collections of his articles and unpublished papers have appeared. Peirce was a brilliant logician and creative metaphysician. His papers, many published long after his death, are of great importance in the philosophical literature.

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