The Peerage of Ireland: Or, A Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom, Volume 6

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J. Moore, 1789 - Heraldry
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Contents

I
1
II
29
III
37
IV
53
V
55
VI
65
VII
68
VIII
73
XI
81
XII
85
XIII
92
XIV
124
XV
132
XVI
160
XVII
215
XVIII
236

IX
74
X
78
XIX
262
XX
299

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Page 295 - Who knew no Wish but what the world might hear : Of softest manners, unaffected mind, Lover of peace, and friend of human kind : Go live ! for Heav'n's Eternal year is thine, Go, and exalt thy Moral to Divine.
Page 296 - Not parted long, and now to part no more ! Go, then, where only blifs fincere is known ! Go, where to love and to enjoy are one ! Yet take thefe tears, Mortality's relief, And till we fhare your joys, forgive our grief: ' Thefe little rites, a ftone, a verfe receive, 'Tis all a father, all a friend can give...
Page 183 - Robert, and the heirs male of his body ; remainder to the heirs male of Robert Sotwell, the father; ultimate remainder to the right heirs of Robert Sotwell, the father, for ever.
Page 295 - Of fofteft manners, unaffected mind, Lover of peace, and friend of human kind : Go live ! for Heav'n's Eternal year is thine, Go, and exalt thy Moral to Divine. And thou, bleft Maid ! attendant on his doom, Penfive...
Page 292 - May, 1725, whom it were unpardonable to lay down in silence, and of whom it is difficult to speak with justice, for her just charac;er will look like flattery, and the least abatement of it be an injury to her memory.
Page 156 - Kinsale in your kingdom of Ireland : the reason of my appearing covered in your majesty's presence is to assert the ancient privilege of my family, granted to Sir John de Courcy, Earl of Ulster, and his heirs, by John, King of England, for him and his successors for ever.
Page 269 - Under this stone the matchless Digby lies, Digby the great, the valiant, and the wise : This age's wonder, for his noble parts ; Skill'd in six tongues, and learn'd in all the arts. Born on the day he dy'd, th...
Page 281 - Glenmaleroe, so as you can't but know in your own conscience, that I am innocent of doing you any injury, unless you count it an injury for my people to bring back a small quantity of mine own goods...
Page 126 - Several attempts have been lately made, and with some success, to establish in this kingdom new manufactures, to revive and improve the old, and to extend its commerce. The lower orders of the people are recovering from their former indolence and ignorance; and the spirit of enterprize and of industry, — the great spring of national happiness, begins to diffuse itself through the nation. " From these dispositions in the people, and the generous encouragement given to every useful undertaking by...
Page 129 - ... another gentleman in my room : And " give me leave, gentlemen, at the fame time, to make my " moft humble and grateful acknowledgments to you for " your tendernefs and indulgence to my errors, and for the " conftant and honourable fupport which you have given me " in the difc,harge of my duty, during the courfe of four" teen years and upwards, the memory of which can never

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