The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783

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Little, Brown, 1890 - Naval history - 557 pages
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User Review  - nandadevi - LibraryThing

Well sometimes a classic is book that is good to own, but not to read. Innovative as it might have been in it's day, it's more significant on reflection for creating history (arguably being an ... Read full review

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User Review  - dcornwall - LibraryThing

Such a hard long slog, but useful points were made. Especially about the roots of sea power and how sometimes the best way to seize land is to hold the seas. Some of the book has been overtaken by ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
25
III
90
IV
139
V
173
VI
201
VII
232
VIII
254
IX
281
X
330
XI
359
XII
401
XIII
419
XIV
468
XV
505
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Page 112 - The Second in Command will, after my intentions are made known to him, have the entire direction of his Line to make the attack upon the Enemy, and to follow up the blow until they are captured or destroyed.
Page 398 - If France delays a timely and powerful aid in the critical posture of our affairs, it will avail us nothing should she attempt it hereafter.
Page 25 - ... a wide common, over which men may pass in all directions, but on which some well-worn paths show that controlling reasons have led them to choose certain lines of travel rather than others.
Page 379 - signal for every ship to bear down, and ' steer for her opposite in the enemy's line, ' agreeable to the 21st article of the additional
Page iv - has there been witnessed the struggle of the highest individual genius against the resources and institutions of a great nation, and in both cases the nation has been victorious. For seventeen years Hannibal strove against Rome ; for sixteen years Napoleon Bonaparte strove against England : the efforts of the first ended in Zama ; those of the second in Waterloo.
Page 532 - I beg to inform your lordship, that the port of Toulon has never been blockaded by me : quite the reverse. Every opportunity has been offered the enemy to put to sea : for it is there that we hope to realize the hopes and expectations of our country.
Page 1 - On the other hand, wars arising from other causes have been greatly modified in their conduct and issue by the control of the sea. Therefore the history of sea power, while embracing in its broad sweep all that tends to make a people great upon the sea or by the sea, is largely a military history; and it is in this aspect that it will be mainly, though not exclusively, regarded in the following pages.
Page 278 - Never, perhaps, did any war, after so many great events, and so large a loss of blood and treasure, end in replacing the nations engaged in it so nearly in the same situation as they held at first.
Page iv - One point, however, of the similitude between the two wars has scarcely been adequately dwelt on ; that is, the remarkable parallel between the Roman general who finally defeated the great Carthaginian, and the English general who gave the last deadly overthrow to the French emperor. Scipio and Wellington both held for many years commands of high importance, tut distant from the main theatres of warfare.

About the author (1890)

Alfred Thayer Mahan was born on September 27, 1840 at West Point, New York, where his father was a professor of Civil and Military Engineering at the U.S. Military Academy. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1859 and embarked on a nearly 40-year naval career seeing duty in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico against the Confederacy. He taught briefly at Annapolis, but spent most of his academic career at the newly founded Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he eventually served as president. He wrote twenty books during his lifetime including The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783; The Influence of Sea Power upon the French Revolution and Empire, 1793-1812; The Interest of America in Sea Power, Present and Future; The Life of Nelson; and The Major Operations of the Navies in the War of American Independence. He died on December 1, 1914.

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