Mind Over Matter: The Epic Crossing of the Antarctic Continent

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Random House Publishing Group, Aug 1, 1995 - Science - 336 pages
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Mind Over Matter is the death-defying and bone-chilling account of Fiennes's most remarkable achievement. For 1,350 miles at a rate of 14 miles a day, Fiennes and his partner Dr. Michael Stroud trudged across Antarctica. But the expedition's world records for both the longest unsupported polar journey and the first unsupported crossing of Antarctica came at an incredible cost. Each pulling a 500-pound sled while encountering cavernous crevasses and bitter blizzards with temperatures at -86[degree]F, the two men faced gangrene, altitude sickness, starvation, hypothermia, and equipment failure that nearly claimed their lives long before they reached the South Pole. The tortuous trek took a mental toll as well. Tensions turned to frustrations that were taken out on each other, and by journey's end the two good friends were deeply antagonistic. With an honest and vivid narrative, Fiennes takes the reader through the coldest land on earth and describes what it takes to survive a monumental physical and mental challenge.

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User Review  - jayne_charles - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this factual account of two men walking to the South Pole pulling giant sledges behind them. The writing was excellent, really conveyed the sense of living on the edge of civilization ... Read full review

Mind over matter: the epic crossing of the Antarctic continent

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Fiennes now tells his version of the historic expedition to Antarctica undertaken with Dr. Mike Stroud. In November 1992, Fiennes and Stroud, both veteran British polar explorers, set out to achieve ... Read full review

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About the author (1995)

Sir Ranulph Fiennes is the first man to have reached both poles by surface travel and the first to have crossed the Antarctic Continent unsupported. He is the only person in the world to have been awarded two clasps to the Polar Medal for both the Antarctic and Arctic regions. Fiennes also led the first polar circumnavigation of the earth. In 1993 Her Majesty the Queen awarded Fiennes the Order of the British Empire (OBE) because, on the way to breaking these historic records, he has raised over twenty millions dollars for charity. In 2003 he ran seven marathons in seven days on seven continents in aid of the Heart Foundation. In 2009 he became the oldest Briton to reach the summit of Everest.

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