The Films of Akira Kurosawa

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University of California Press, 1998 - Performing Arts - 273 pages
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In an epilogue provided for his incomparable study of Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), Donald Richie reflects on Kurosawa's life work of thirty feature films and describes his last, unfinished project, a film set in the Edo period to be called The Ocean Was Watching.
Kurosawa remains unchallenged as one of the century's greatest film directors. Through his long and distinguished career he managed, like very few others in the teeth of a huge and relentless industry, to elevate each of his films to a distinctive level of art. His Rashomon--one of the best-remembered and most talked-of films in any language--was a revelation when it appeared in 1950 and did much to bring Japanese cinema to the world's attention. Kurosawa's films display an extraordinary breadth and an astonishing strength, from the philosophic and sexual complexity of Rashomon to the moral dedication of Ikiru, from the naked violence of Seven Samurai to the savage comedy of Yojimbo, from the terror-filled feudalism of Throne of Blood to the piercing wit of Sanjuro. In an epilogue provided for his incomparable study of Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), Donald Richie reflects on Kurosawa's life work of thirty feature films and describes his last, unfinished project, a film set in the Edo period to be called The Ocean Was Watching.
Kurosawa remains unchallenged as one of the century's greatest film directors. Through his long and distinguished career he managed, like very few others in the teeth of a huge and relentless industry, to elevate each of his films to a distinctive level of art. His Rashomon--one of the best-remembered and most talked-of films in any language--was a revelation when it appeared in 1950 and did much to bring Japanese cinema to the world's attention. Kurosawa's films display an extraordinary breadth and an astonishing strength, from the philosophic and sexual complexity of Rashomon to the moral dedication of Ikiru, from the naked violence of Seven Samurai to the savage comedy of Yojimbo, from the terror-filled feudalism of Throne of Blood to the piercing wit of Sanjuro.
 

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The films of Akira Kurosawa

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This third edition of a work first published in 1965 covers the four films made since the second edition was released, including Ran, arguably Kurosawa's biggest hit in America. Kurosawa is ... Read full review

Contents

Sanshiro SugataPart II Sugata Sanshiro Zoku
24
One Wonderful Sunday Subarashiki Nichiyobi
43
Stray Dog Nora
65
The Idiot Hakuthi
81
Seven Samurai Shuhinin no Samurai
97
The Throne of Blood Kumonosujo
115
The Hidden Fortress KakushiToride no San Akunin
134
Yojimbo Yojimho
147
High and Low Tengoku to Jigoku
163
Dodesukaden Dodesukaden
185
Kagemusha Kagemusha
204
Dreams Yume
220
Epilogue
244
A Selective Bibliography
262
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About the author (1998)

Donald Richie is the Arts Critic for The Japan Times.

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