Daring Deeds of Merchant Seaman in the Great War

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G. G. Harrap & Company, Limited, 1918 - Merchant marine - 319 pages
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Page 11 - They that go down to the sea in ships : and occupy their business in great waters; These men see the works of the Lord : and his wonders in the deep.
Page 309 - The control of the sea, however real, does not imply that an enemy's single ships or small squadrons cannot steal out of port, cannot cross more or less frequented tracts of ocean, make harassing descents upon unprotected points of a long coastline, enter blockaded harbors. On the contrary, history has shown that such evasions are always possible, to some extent, to the weaker party, however great the inequality of naval strength.
Page 200 - The only means of preventing surprise attacks from the civil population has been to interfere with unrelenting severity and to create examples, which by their frightfulness would be a warning to the whole country.
Page 181 - Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag, And smile, smile, smile, While you've a lucifer to light your fag, Smile, boys, that's the style.
Page 259 - End on the other. Should enemy hospital ships be encountered in this maritime zone, after an appropriate lapse of time, they will be considered as belligerent and will be attacked without further consideration. The German Government believe themselves all the more justified in adopting these measures as the route from Western and Southern France to the West of England still remains open for enemy hospital ships, and the transport of English wounded to their homes can consequently be effected now...
Page 6 - So long as tides shall run, Who gave the seas their glorious dead From rise to set of sun, — All honour be to merchantmen, While England's name shall stand, Who sailed and fought, and dared and died, And served and saved their land. A sailing ship from Liverpool — a tanker from the Clyde — A schooner from the West countrie — a tug from Merseyside — A fishing smack from Grimsby town — a coaler from the Tyne — All honour be to merchantmen while sun and moon do shine I C.
Page 226 - ... war broke out. It was assuredly no oversight on the part of the German authorities, for in several conversations the writer had with Admiral von Tirpitz in 1911 in regard to Germany's submarine policy the latter expressed emphatically as his opinion that he considered submarines to be in an experimental stage, of doubtful utility, and that the German government was not at all convinced that they would form an essential or conspicuous part of their future naval programs.
Page 220 - A good lookout kept by an experienced man covering a great many attacks by submarines has given us the following facts: That if a submarine is sighted by the lookout on a vessel, whether the vessel is armed or not, it is seven to three on the ship in favor of getting away; out of every ten attacks when the submarine is sighted by the ship seven of them fail, but of every ten attacks when the submarine is not sighted eight ships go down. It is seven to three on the ship if the submarine is sighted...
Page 226 - ... submarine policy the latter expressed emphatically as his opinion that he considered submarines to be in an experimental stage, of doubtful utility, and that the German government was not at all convinced that they would form an essential or conspicuous part of their future naval programs. This opinion, which undoubtedly incorporated the opinion of his principal subordinates, was not expressed with any purpose of misleading, for it was a well-known fact at the time to every one in the profession...
Page 159 - Our boarding officer interviews the captain of the merchantman, who states his port of origin, his destination, his cargo, the length of his voyage, and whether or not he stands in need of any assistance. The crew is sometimes mustered in suspicious cases to determine whether any German subjects are aboard. Finally, the manifests are carefully examined. " In many cases the neutral ship is quite innocent, and is allowed immediately to proceed ; in fact, whenever there is fair doubt about the cargo,...

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