MacMillan's Magazine, Volume 4

Front Cover
Sir George Grove, David Masson, John Morley, Mowbray Morris
1861
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Page 462 - To borrow money on the credit of the United States; To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes; To establish a...
Page 466 - Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite ideas ; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man ; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition. This our new government is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.
Page 316 - John Anderson my jo. John Anderson my jo, John, We clamb the hill thegither ; And mony a canty day, John, We've had wi' ane anither : Now we maun totter down, John, But hand in hand we'll go, And sleep thegither at the foot, John Anderson my jo.
Page 316 - MY JO. JOHN Anderson my jo, John, When we were first acquent ; Your locks were like the raven, Your bonnie brow was brent ; But now your brow is beld, John Your locks are like the snaw ; But blessings on your frosty pow, John Anderson my jo.
Page 321 - A voice talked with her through the shadows cool More sweet to me than song. Ah, Willie, Willie, was my love less worth Than apples with their green leaves piled above ? I counted rosiest apples on the earth Of far less worth than love.
Page 466 - The prevailing ideas entertained by him and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old Constitution were that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically.
Page 176 - Truly, shepherd, in respect of itself, it is a good life; but in respect that it is a shepherd's life, it is naught. In respect that it is solitary, I like it very well ; but in respect that it is private, it is a very vile life. Now in respect it is in the fields, it pleaseth me well ; but in respect it is not in the court, it is tedious.
Page 321 - An Apple Gathering I PLUCKED pink blossoms from mine apple-tree And wore them all that evening in my hair: Then in due season when I went to see I found no apples there. With dangling basket all along the grass As I had come I went the selfsame track: My neighbours mocked me while they saw me pass So empty-handed back.
Page 462 - This Constitution and the laws of the United States made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States shall be the supreme law of the land, and the judges of every state shall be bound thereby, any thing in the Constitution or laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding.
Page 151 - Once fairly SEEN, all our doubts and fears regarding them were ended: and then the garrison's long pent-up feelings of anxiety and suspense burst forth in a succession of deafening cheers; from every pit, trench and battery — from behind the sandbags piled on shattered houses — from every post still held by a few gallant spirits, rose cheer on cheer...

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