The Captain and the Enemy

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Penguin, 1999 - Fiction - 188 pages
8 Reviews
Victor Baxter is a young boy when a secretive stranger known simply as "the Captain" brings him from his boarding school to London. Victor becomes the surrogate son and companion of a woman named Liza, who renames him "Jim" and depends on him for any news about the world outside their door. Raised in these odd yet touching circumstances, Jim is never quite sure of Liza's relationship to the Captain, who is often away on mysterious errands. It is not until Jim reaches manhood that he confronts the Captain and learns the shocking truth about the man, his allegiances, and the true nature of love.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Eamonn12 - LibraryThing

What to say about this book? Not much. It could be seen as a work that would never have been published if some unknown writer had penned it. What a disappointment for those who hold Graham Green in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nandadevi - LibraryThing

Perhaps this is a bit more Greene meets Waugh, it has that kind of a slow train wreck fascination thing going on. But there's a lightness of tone that suggests the possibility of a happy outcome. But ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
7
x
28
Chapter 3
47
Chapter 4
52
x
58
Chapter 6
75
II
81
7 x
83
2
125
3
131
4
132
5
133
6
138
7
143
8
145
9
153

2
92
III
107
x
109
IV
181
x
183
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Graham Greene (1904-1991), whose long life nearly spanned the length of the twentieth century, was one of its greatest novelists. Educated at Berkhamsted School and Balliol College, Oxford, he started his career as a sub-editor of the London Times He began to attract notice as a novelist with his fourth book, Orient Express in 1932. In 1935, he trekked across northern Liberia, his first experience in Africa, told in A Journey Without Maps (1936). He converted to Catholicism in 1926, an edifying decision, and reported on religious persecution in Mexico in 1938 in The Lawless Roads which served as a background for his famous The Power and the Glory, one of several “Catholic” novels (Brighton Rock The Heart of the Matter The End of the Affair ). During the war he worked for the British secret service in Sierra Leone; afterward, he began wide-ranging travels as a journalist, which were reflected in novels such as The Quiet American Our Man in Havana The Comedians Travels with My Aunt The Honorary Consul The Human Factor Monsignor Quixote and The Captain and the Enemy As well as his many novels, Graham Greene wrote several collections of short stories, four travel books, six plays, two books of autobiography, A Sort of Life and Ways of Escape, two biographies, and four books for children. He also contributed hundreds of essays and film and book reviews to The Spectator and other journals, many of which appear in the late collection Reflections Most of his novels have been filmed, including The Third Man, which the author first wrote as a film treatment. Graham Greene was named Companion of Honour and received the Order of Merit among numerous other awards.

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