Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: To which are Added a Few Poems, Volume 2

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J. Munroe, 1845 - American literature - 563 pages
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Page 209 - Treason, felony, Sword, pike, knife, gun, or need of any engine Would I not have ; but nature should bring forth Of its own kind, all foison, all abundance, To feed my innocent people.
Page 209 - I' the commonwealth I would by contraries Execute all things ; for no kind of traffic Would I admit ; no name of magistrate ; Letters should not be known : riches, poverty, And use of service, none ; contract, succession, Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none : No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil : No occupation ; all men idle, all ; And women too ; but innocent and pure : No sovereignty : — Seb.
Page 212 - Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep ; so shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth, and thy want as an armed man.
Page 320 - So much understanding, so much knowledge, so much innocence, and such humility, I did not think had been the portion of any but angels, till I saw this gentleman.
Page 406 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 462 - I had rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind ; and, therefore, God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it.
Page 255 - And more than echoes talk along the walls. Here, as I watch'd the dying lamps around, From yonder shrine I heard a hollow sound. "Come, sister, come! (it said, or seem'd to say) Thy place is here, sad sister, come away; Once like thyself, I trembled, wept, and pray'd, Love's victim then, though now a sainted maid : But all is calm in this eternal sleep ; Here Grief forgets to groan, and Love to weep, E'en Superstition loses every fear: For God, not man, absolves our frailties here.
Page 243 - Greek mythology, a. monster with the body of a man and the head of a bull.
Page 320 - Westward the course of empire takes its way ; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day — Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 212 - She riseth while it is yet night, and giveth meat to her household, and a portion to her maidens. She maketh herself coverings of tapestry, her clothing is silk and purple. Strength and honour are in her clothing, and she shall rejoice in time to come.

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