The Blind Watchmaker

Front Cover
Penguin, 2006 - Biodiversity - 340 pages

***30th Anniversary Edition***

Cover note: Each copy of the anniversary edition of The Blind Watchmaker features a unique biomorph. No two covers are exactly alike.

Acclaimed as the most influential work on evolution written in the last hundred years, The Blind Watchmaker offers an inspiring and accessible introduction to one of the most important scientific discoveries of all time. A brilliant and controversial book which demonstrates that evolution by natural selection - the unconscious, automatic, blind yet essentially non-random process discovered by Darwin - is the only answer to the biggest question of all: why do we exist?

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Despite Dawkins' insistence the book needed no updates, The Blind Watchmaker doesn't actually age that well. Of course, this is mostly because the themes, ideas and research contained therein have now become so embedded in mainstream though that it's night-impossible for any informed reader to not already be familiar with them. Still, it serves its purpose well - to be a middling-level introduction to evolutionary thought and theory. Somewhere between an introductory text and a book of essays for a slightly more advanced class of biology students. 

Review: The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design

User Review  - Seth Hanson - Goodreads

At the time, this was a tough book for me to read. Considering the way I was raised - in a heavily religious atmosphere - it was hard for me to accept the theory of evolution. However, Dawkins very ... Read full review

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About the author (2006)

In 1995 Richard Dawkins became the first holder of the Charles Simonyi Chair of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University. He is the bestselling author of THE SELFISH GENE, CLIMBING MOUNT IMPROBABLE (Penguin, 1996) and UNWEAVING THE RAINBOW (Penguin, 1998).

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