Life Ascending: The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution

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W. W. Norton & Company, Jun 14, 2010 - Science - 352 pages
5 Reviews

“Original and awe-inspiring . . . an exhilarating tour of some of the most profound and important ideas in biology.”—New Scientist

Where does DNA come from? What is consciousness? How did the eye evolve? Drawing on a treasure trove of new scientific knowledge, Nick Lane expertly reconstructs evolution’s history by describing its ten greatest inventions—from sex and warmth to death—resulting in a stunning account of nature’s ingenuity.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MarkBeronte - LibraryThing

Where does DNA come from? What is consciousness? How did the eye evolve? Drawing on a treasure trove of new scientific knowledge, Nick Lane expertly reconstructs evolution’s history by describing its ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Rozella - LibraryThing

I am very impressed with this book. Nick Lane has taken what he calls "ten great inventions of evolution" and given some well argued narratives of how it all happened. Shows some of the interesting ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The Origin of Life
8
DNA
34
Photosynthesis
60
The Complex Cell
88
Sex
118
Movement
144
Sight
172
Hot Blood
205
Consciousness
232
Death
260
Epilogue
286
List of Illustrations
307
Bibliography
313
Index
327
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About the author (2010)

Nick Lane is a biochemist in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at University College London, and leads the UCL Origins of Life Program. He was awarded the 2015 Biochemical Society Award for his outstanding contribution to the molecular life sciences. He is the author of Life Ascending: The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution, which won the 2010 Royal Society Prize for Science Books, as well as Power, Sex, Suicide: Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life and Oxygen: The Molecule that Made the World.

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