Forgecraft

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R. G. Adams, 1913 - Forging - 175 pages
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Page 54 - For all plates ordered to gauge, there will be permitted an average excess of weight over that corresponding to the dimensions on the order, equal in amount to that specified in the following table: TABLE OF ALLOWANCES FOR OVERWEIGHT FOR RECTANGULAR PLATES WHEN ORDERED TO GAUGE.
Page 52 - The tensile strength, limit of elasticity and ductility shall be determined from a standard test piece cut from the finished material. The standard shape of the test piece for sheared plates shall be as shown.
Page 52 - Material which is to be used without annealing or further treatment shall be tested in the condition in which it comes from the rolls.
Page 54 - The variation in cross-section or weight of more than 2\ per cent from that specified will be sufficient cause for rejection, except in the case of sheared plates, which will be covered by the following permissible variations...
Page 52 - For other material the test specimen may be the same as for sheared plates, or it may be planed or turned parallel throughout its entire length and in all cases where possible, two opposite sides of the test specimens shall be the rolled surfaces.
Page 52 - ... inch or less in diameter, in which case the elongation shall be measured in a length equal to eight times the diameter of section tested.
Page 52 - Ultimate strength, 55,000 to 65,000 pounds per square inch. Elastic limit, not less than onehalf the ultimate strength. Elongation, 25 per cent. Cold and Quench bends, 180 degrees flat on itself, without fracture on outside of bent portion.
Page 54 - Up to 75 inches wide, 2 per cent, above or 2} per cent, below the theoretical weight. 75 inches wide up to 100 inches wide, 5 per cent, above or 3 per cent, below the theoretical weight. When 100 inches wide and over, 10 per cent, above or 8 per cent, below the theoretical weight.
Page 64 - ... by the boring of a cannon at the arsenal at Munich." Work in the same direction was done by Sir Humphrey Davy, Sadi Carnot, Dr. Mayer and Mr. Colding. But Dr. Joule, from 1843 to 1849, made a series of experiments by various methods, the results of which have been generally accepted as satisfactory. Quantities of heat are measured, in English units, by what is termed the British Thermal Unit, or for brevity, BTU The BTU is the quantity of heat required to raise 1 Ib. of pure water from a temperature...
Page 52 - Bending test, 180 degrees flat on itself, without fracture on outside of bent portion. 10. Soft Steel. — Ultimate strength, 52,000 to 62,000 pounds per square inch. Elastic limit, not less than one-half the ultimate strength. Elongation, 25 per cent.

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