Brun Campbell: The Original Ragtime Kid

Front Cover
McFarland, Apr 7, 2016 - Music - 260 pages
0 Reviews
At fifteen, Sanford Brunson Campbell (1884–1952) became enchanted with the new sounds of ragtime and ran away from his rural Kansas home, hopping a train to Sedalia, Missouri, determined to take piano lessons from a black musician he had never met. Scott Joplin nicknamed his white protégé “The Ragtime Kid.” A composer and entertainer at the dawn of the ragtime era, “Brun” was a prime mover in the ragtime revival of the 1940s and helped establish Joplin’s prominence as one of America’s most innovative composers. Campbell’s own legacy was tarnished by his inability to tell a straight story and he was often dismissed as a liar and a clown. Based on his memoirs, musical compositions and correspondence with music industry notables, this first comprehensive biography of Campbell reveals an engaging storyteller and a devotee wholly dedicated to a musical genre that had been largely forgotten. His firsthand account of life as an itinerant pianist in the Midwest provides a unique picture of life a century ago.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
I When Ragtime Was Young
9
II When the Ragtime Kid Grew Old
64
III Short Pieces
148
An Appreciation
185
The 1940s Musical Composition by Richard Egan
191
Conclusion
204
Musical Works by Brun Campbell
207
Writings and Readings
213
When Ragtime Was Young and When the Ragtime Kid Grew Old Bruns Organizational Variations
219
Transcripts of Hal Nichols Memories N Melodies Radio Shows
223
Interview of Cecil Charles Spiller by Galen Wilkes January 26 1992
231
Brun Campbell Family Tree
241
Index
243
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2016)

The late Larry Karp practiced perinatal medicine for 25 years, specializing in the care of high-risk pregnancies. His publications include eight mystery novels, a children’s book and three works of nonfiction. He lived in Seattle, Washington.

Bibliographic information