Letters of the Late Alexander Pope, ... to a Lady: Never Before Published

Front Cover
J. Dodsley, 1769 - 87 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - But soft recesses for th' uneasy mind, To sigh unheard in, to the passing wind ! So the struck deer, in some sequester'd part, Lies down to die (the arrow in his heart) ; There hid in shades, and wasting day by day, Inly he bleeds, and pants his soul away.
Page 81 - I have long had an inclination to tell a fairy tale, the more wild and exotic the better; therefore a vision, which is confined to no rules of probability, will take in all the variety and luxuriancy of description you will; provided there be an apparent moral to it. I think, one or two of the Persian tales would give one hints for such an invention...
Page 81 - ... a vision, which is confined to no rules of probability, will take in all the variety and luxuriancy of description you will ; provided there be an apparent moral to it. I think, one or two of the Persian tales would give one hints for such an invention : and perhaps if the scenes were taken from real places that are known, in order to compliment particular gardens and buildings of a fine taste (as I believe several of Chaucer's descriptions do, though it is what nobody has observed), it would...
Page 31 - ... long youth, long pleasure — and a friend ! Not with those toys the woman-world admire, Riches that vex, and vanities that tire : Let joy or ease, let affluence or content, And the gay conscience of a life well-spent...
Page 26 - You have fpoiled him for a folitaire and a book all the days of his life ; and put him into fuch a condition, that he thinks of nothing, and enquires of nothing, but after a perfon. who has nothing to fay to him ; and has left him for ever without hope of ever again regarding, or pleafing, or entertaining him, much lefs of feeing him.
Page 36 - States; and in each of them, we Poetical Fidlers make but part of their Pleasure, or of their Equipage. And the misery is, we, in our turns are so vain (at least I have been so) as to chuse to pipe without being payd, and so silly to be pleased with piping to those who understand musick less than ourselves.
Page 37 - I muft neither difobey nor difappoint (I mean two or three in the world only) to go on with it. They make me do as mean a thing as the greateft man of them could do -, feem to depend, and to folicit, when I do not want; and make a kind of court to thofe above my rank, juft as they do to thofe above theirs, when we might much more wifely and agreeably live of ourfelves, and to ourfelves.
Page 80 - I could wish you tried something in the descriptive way, on any subject you please, mixed with vision and moral ; like pieces of the old Provencal poets, which abound with fancy, and are the most amusing scenes in nature. There are three or four of this kind in Chaucer, admirable ; the Flower and the Leaf every body has been delighted with.
Page 52 - G 2 this . this age can hardly ever afford to bear, and not often can fuftain). Yet perhaps it is one of the beft things that can be faid of poetry, that it helps us to pafs over the toils and troubles of this...
Page 9 - I am far more defirous to be admitted as yours, on the more meritorious title of friendfhip. I have ever believed this as a facred maxim, that the moft ingenious natures were the moft fincere; and the moft knowing and fenfible minds made the beft friends. Of all thofe that I have thought it the felicity of my life to know, I have ever found the moft diftinguifhed in capacity, the moft diftinguifhed in morality ; and thofe the moft to be depended on, whom one efteemed fo much as to defire they mould...

Bibliographic information