A Room of One's Own

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Penguin Adult, Sep 2, 2004 - Fiction - 131 pages
The essay examines whether women were capable of producing work of the quality of William Shakespeare, amongst other topics. In one section, Woolf invented a fictional "Shakespeare's Sister", Judith, to illustrate that a woman with Shakespeare's gifts would have been denied the same opportunities to develop them because of the doors that were closed to women. Woolf also examines the careers of several female authors, including Jane Austen, the Brontė sisters and George Eliot. The author subtly refers to several of the most prominent intellectuals of the time, and her hybrid name for the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge - Oxbridge - has become a well-known term in English satire. The title comes from Woolf's conception that to be a successful writer, a woman needed space of her own in which to work and enough money to support herself. It also refers to any author's need for poetic license and the personal liberty to create art.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - VhartPowers - LibraryThing

I'm only half way through, but thus far, sigh, it's so monotonous and she goes on and on repetitively about men. Alright already, we got it! I find it interesting that in just 54 pages she has already ... Read full review

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User Review  - dchaikin - LibraryThing

37. A Room of One's Own (audio) by Virginia Woolf reader: Juliet Stevenson published: 1929, 2011 audio format: 5:02 Libby audiobook Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) is recognized as a major twentieth-century author and was a central figure in the Bloomsbury group. Her most famous novels include Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, The Waves and Orlando. She drowned herself in 1941.

Virginia Woolf, born in 1882, was the major novelist at the heart of the inter-war Bloomsbury Group. Her early novels include The Voyage Out, Night and Day and Jacob's Room. Between 1925 and 1931 she produced her finest masterpieces, including Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando and the experimental The Waves. Her later novels include The Years and Between the Acts, and she also maintained an astonishing output of literary criticism, journalism and biography, including the passionate feminist essay A Room of One's Own. Suffering from depression, she drowned herself in the River Ouse in 1941.

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