Appalachia, Volume 11

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Appalachian Mountain Club, 1908 - Appalachian Mountains
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Page 358 - ITS DESOLATE SITUATION IS APPARENT. only partially consumed when saucepans were placed at the ordinary distance above the latter, the rest escaping in smoky ill-smelling fumes. To insure complete combustion it was necessary to give the flame its full height, so that the air could have access to it from every point. With this precaution petroleum in a primus stove makes a more efficient fuel and generates a much greater heat at high altitudes than alcohol used in any apparatus I have seen. The wicks...
Page ix - I guessed it would take some fifty steps and half an hour's work to reach it. We cut about fifty steps, however, in the first half-hour, and were not a quarter of the way to my mark ; and as even when there we should not be half-way to the top, matters began to look serious. The ice was very hard, and it was necessary, as Lauener observed, to cut steps in it as big as soup-tureens, for the result of a slip would in all probability have been that the rest of our lives would have been spent in sliding...
Page 32 - In the accidental intercourse of those who have been engaged in such expeditions, it has been perceived that the community of taste and feeling amongst those who, in the life of the high Alps, have shared the same enjoyments, the same labors, and the same dangers, constitutes a bond of sympathy stronger than many of those by which men are drawn into association ; and early in the year 1858, it was resolved to give scope for the extension of this mutual feeling amongst all who have explored high mountain...
Page 216 - Noire. Through this defile it is forced, falling steeply, and forming one of the grandest ice-cascades in the Alps. At the summit it is broken into transverse chasms of enormous width and depth;. the ridges between these break across again, and form those castellated masses to which the name of seracs has been applied. In descending the cascade the ice is crushed and riven; ruined towers, which have tumbled from the summit, cumber the slope, and smooth vertical precipices of ice rise in succession...
Page 48 - The Scientific exploration and study of high mountain elevations and of the regions lying within or about the Arctic and Antarctic circles, the cultivation of the mountain craft, the promotion and dissemination of knowledge regarding the regions above indicated.
Page 357 - PEAKS 3 MILES DISTANT. ONE AT LEFT IS PINNACLE PEAK, 23,300 FEET, ASCENDED JULY 29, 1907. reaching an altitude of 21,000 feet, though naturally a strong and healthy man, he collapsed entirely and became helpless. He complained of loss of sensation in his hands. His woollen mittens being drawn off, his fingers were found white and stiff, and, if not already frostbitten, on the point of becoming so. Vigorous nibbing and pounding of his hands finally restored circulation, when he was sent down to the...
Page 358 - The alcohol in the lighting-cups of the former would not burn until the cups had been heated by the application of half a dozen burning matches, and the petroleum gas issuing from the burners was only partially consumed when cooking-utensils were placed at the ordinary distance above the latter, the rest escaping in smoky, ill-smelling fumes. To insure complete combustion it was necessary to give the flame its full height, so that the air could have access to it from every point. With this precaution...
Page 32 - Shekinah of our modern world, the visible manifestation of the presence of the Almighty. The circumstances of the foundation of this Club are given in the preface to this its first publication : " Of late years an increasing desire has been felt to explore the unknown and little-frequented districts of the Alps. The writings of Professor JD Forbes, those of M. Agassiz and his companions, and of M. Gottlieb Studer, led many, in whom the passion for Alpine scenery was blended with a love of adventure...
Page 358 - ... This constant gasping for breath interfered with sleep, no matter how tired one might be, and if, at last, after a long period of prostrating wakefulness, one did doze for a moment, one would immediately start up with frantic efforts to obtain sufficient oxygen to relieve the stifling sensation which threatened to terminate one's existence. During the five nights at our three highest camps no one obtained more than a few snatches of sleep, and four, of whom I was one, practically none at all....
Page 358 - ... oxygen at these high altitudes. We were conscious of a distinct decline in strength on the last two days, and after six consecutive days of hard work and five sleepless nights every one felt an irresistible desire to relieve the tension by a descent to a lower level. I have elsewhere, in connection with our highest camp in the Chogo Lungma region, at 19,358 feet, where five Europeans were affected in a similar manner during two nights, suggested the possibility that, in attempts on the highest...

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