The English Art of Cookery, According to the Present Practice: Being a Complete Guide to All Housekeepers, on a Plan Entirely New; Consisting of Thirty-eight Chapters

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G. G. J. and J. Robinson, 1788 - Cookery - 656 pages
 

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I've just read through a few recipes and looked at the organization of the book, but I really like it. The recipes seem like they would work and aren't all that different from what I use today. It's also fascinating to see the manner of cooking and the ingredients people were working with in the 1700s. I plan on trying out a few recipes in here, particularly the puff paste (pie crust) recipe. A posthumous shout out to Richard Briggs for putting this book together! 

Selected pages

Contents

I
3
II
30
IV
65
V
124
VI
139
VIII
151
IX
176
X
181
XXV
455
XXVI
468
XXVII
479
XXVIII
489
XXIX
499
XXX
514
XXXI
516
XXXII
525

XI
187
XII
194
XIII
217
XIV
302
XV
309
XVI
317
XVII
347
XIX
359
XXI
398
XXII
442
XXIII
449
XXXIII
541
XXXIV
546
XXXV
559
XXXVI
561
XXXVII
566
XXXVIII
573
XXXIX
597
XL
611
XLI
621
XLII
631
XLIII
652

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Page 533 - ... at least, and mix them with your cake, then put in your flour, mace, and nutmeg, keep beating it well till your oven is ready, put in your brandy, and beat...
Page 608 - ... off the top, and then put it into the water •, then add the juice and rinds of fifty oranges, but not the white parts of the rinds, and...
Page 608 - Pick the elder-berries when full ripe ; put them into a stone jar, and set them in the oven, or a kettle of boiling water, till the jar is hot through ; then take them out and strain them through a coarse...
Page 610 - ... in the bark, grows thick and coloured, which before was thin and clear. The method of procuring the juice is by boring holes in the body of the tree and putting in fdflers, which are commonly made of the branches of elder, the pith being taken out.
Page 541 - ... to feafon them, and to give them a flavour^ but no more. The next day, take the leaf of the hog and cut...
Page 583 - ... you do not let the knife touch the top) throw them into fait and water for an hour ; then take them out, and lay them on a cloth to drain; then put them into large widemouthed...
Page 518 - ... it; put in your peels, and boil them over a flow fire, till 'you fee . the fyrup candy about the pan and peels, then take them out, and grate fine fugar all over them, lay them on a hair fieve to drain, and fet them in a ftove, or before the fire to dry, and keep them in a dry place for ufe.— NB Do not cover your faucepan when you boil either lemons or oranges.
Page 611 - ... well ; pour it into a clean tub, and when it is almost cold, set it to work with yeast spread upon a toast.
Page 589 - Mackarel you may take one Ounce of beaten Pepper, three large Nutmegs, a little Mace, and a Handful of Salt; mix your Salt and beaten Spice together...
Page 477 - Take a quart of the thickest cream you can get, and make it pretty sweet with fine sugar. Pour in a gill of sack, grate in the yellow rind of a lemon, and mill the cream till it is of a thick froth : then carefully pour the thin from the froth into a dish.

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