Agency and Joint Attention

Front Cover
Janet Metcalfe, Herbert S. Terrace
OUP USA, Sep 19, 2013 - Medical - 357 pages
Human infants do not seem to be born with concepts of self or joint attention. One basic goal of Agency and Joint Attention is to unravel how these abilities originate. One approach that has received a lot of recent attention is social. Some argue that by virtue of an infant's intense eye gaze with her mother, she is able, by the age of four months, to establish a relationship with her mother that differentiates between "me" and "you." At about twelve months, the infant acquires the non-verbal ability to share attention with her mother or other caregivers. Although the concepts of self and joint attention are nonverbal and uniquely human, the question remains, how do we establish metacognitive control of these abilities? A tangential question is whether nonhuman animals develop abilities that are analogous to self and joint attention. Much of this volume is devoted to the development of metacognition of self and joint attention in experiments on the origin of consciousness, knowing oneself, social referencing, joint action, the neurological basis of joint attention, the role of joint action, mirror neurons, phenomenology, and cues for agency.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Why Two Minds Are Better Than One
11
2 How Joint Is the Joint Attention of Apes and Human Infants?
49
The BehavioristicMentalistic Dichotomy in Comparative Theory of Mind Research
62
4 BehaviorReading versus Mentalizing in Animals
82
An Emerging Presymbolic Theory of Mind
100
6 Gaze Following and Agency in Human Infancy
125
The Natural Pedagogy Hypothesis
139
Precursors of Social Referencing?
196
12 Linking Joint Attention and Joint Action
206
13 Do You See What I See? The Neural Bases of Joint Attention
216
14 Knowing that the Self is the Agent
238
Time Can Tell
256
CrossTalk between Procedural and Declarative Action Knowledge
268
Phenomenal States Ideomotor Processing and the Skeletal Muscle System
284
18 The Function of Consciousness in Controlling Behavior
304

8 Embodied Attention in Infant Pointing
152
9 Understanding the Structure of Communicative Interactions in Infancy
165
A New Look at the Cortical Motor System
178
Many Facets Multiple Sources
321
Index
347
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About the author (2013)


Janet Metcalfe, Betsy Sparrow and Herb TerraceAll at Department of Psychology, Columbia University

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