The Roman republic: being a review of some of the salient pointe in its history

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Bradbury & Evans, 1860
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Page 108 - Meantime, we very cordially recommend Mr. Knight's volumes to the readers whom they seek. We know of no history of England so free from prejudice, so thoroughly honest and impartial, so stored with facts, fancies, and illustrations— and therefore none so well adapted for school or college as this 'Popular History of England.
Page 20 - We recollect how the greatest of English statesmen, bowed down by years and infirmity like Appius, but roused like him by the dread of approaching dishonour to the English name, was led by his son and son-in-law into the House of Lords, and all the peers with one impulse arose to receive him. We know the expiring words of that mighty voice, when he protested against the dismemberment of this ancient monarchy, and prayed that if England must fall, she might fall with honour. The real speech of Lord...
Page 100 - CommentarH, which are his only works that have come down to us. They relate the history of the first seven years of the Gallic War in seven books, and the history of the civil war, down to the commencement of the Alexandrine, in three books.
Page 108 - OF ENGLAND is beyond all question a very remarkable work. Not the least remarkable feature in it, perhaps, is the freshness of feeling and the catholicity of mind which still inspire a man, whom many yet associate with nothing else than the utilitarianism of the Useful Knowledge Society.
Page 20 - ... memory in our own house of parliament. We recollect how the greatest of English statesmen, bowed down by years and infirmity like Appius, but roused like him by the dread of approaching dishonour to the English name, was led by his son and son-in-law into the House of Lords, and all the peers with one impulse arose to receive him. We know the expiring words of that mighty voice, when he protested against the...
Page 108 - THE POPULAR HISTORY OF ENGLAND OP CHARLES KNIOHT is of a somewhat higher price (comparing it with works issuing in penny numbers) ; but the plates, as well as the paper, are greatly superior, and its literary merits are of a very high order. Indeed, nothing Las ever appeared superior, if anything has been published equal to the account of the state of commerce, government, and society at different periods.
Page 101 - ... is impossible to close this brief sketch of the Prose Literature of the last age of the Republic without some notice of Cicero's writings. Of his oratory and of his letters something has been said in former pages ; and it is to these productions that we must attribute the great Orator's chief merits in the Commonwealth of Letters. Of his poems it were better to say nothing. Of his memoirs and historical writings little has been preserved, unless we count the fragments of " The Republic
Page 108 - Mr. Knight's book well deserves its name : it will be emphatically popular, and it will gain its popularity by genuine merit. It is as good a book of the kind as ever was written.
Page 108 - The Popular History of England' has reached its fourth volume. * * * This extension of the province of history to manners and common life, and all that indicates the condition of the people, is far from new, but it has never been executed with anything like the happy ease with which it is here attempted, not overlaying the public annals, but interpenetrating them. The author apologises for having outgrown the limits originally proposed. This apology will be very readily accepted by his readers,...
Page 106 - ... our recent wars, and recorded by the penmen of the camp and the ship, have been carefully incorporated with the work, and make it the richest we have.

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