The Church Trap

Front Cover
AuthorHouse, 2003 - RELIGION - 192 pages

Churches today are caught in a sociological trap. Parishioners want to keep comfortable status quo organization. Churchmen feel the pressure to modernize, to "get where the action is." This book is a provocative and zesty analysis of the problem.

"Dishonest to God?" The churches have followed corporations in emphasizing fat figures and solid annual growth. If religion were sold like stocks you would have the "high fliers" like the booming Southern Baptists and the Roman Catholics, the "blue chip" denominations-Episcopalians, Congregationalists, and Presbyterians-and then those with small growth potential like the Jews.

"The "sick" clergy." Most clergymen of the various faiths, needless to say, are not alcoholic or homosexual. On the other hand enough clergymen have these problems to cause concern, and beyond the slippery labels of neuroses there are enough inward tortured people in the clergy to make church authorities wonder what in heaven is wrong. "The future." One of the basic models for churchly change is ecumenism, but although ecumenism may look good on the drawing board, it has some very formidable hurdles before it . There is no sign in the heavens that the organized religion in America will be granted a resurrection.

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About the author (2003)

Arthur Herzog III was born in Manhattan on April 6, 1927. He received a bachelor's degree in English literature from Stanford University in 1949 and a master's degree in English literature at Columbia University in 1951. He soon became a freelance magazine writer. During his lifetime, he wrote 16 novels including IQ 83 and Orca, two short story collections, and nine nonfiction books including Vesco, The Church Trap, 17 Days: The Katie Beers Story, and The War-Peace Establishment. His novel, The Swarm was published in 1974 and was adapted into a movie starring Michael Caine in 1978. He also wrote for numerous magazines including Esquire, Harper's, The Nation, and The New York Times Magazine. He died due to complications of a stroke on May 26, 2010 at the age of 83.

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