The Imperial Presidency

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004 - History - 589 pages
3 Reviews
From two-time Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., comes one of the most important and influential investigations of the American presidency. The Imperial Presidency traces the growth of presidential power over two centuries, from George Washington to George W. Bush, examining how it has both served and harmed the Constitution and what Americans can do about it in years to come. The book that gave the phrase “imperial presidency” to the language, this is a work of “substantial scholarship written with lucidity, charm, and wit” (The New Yorker).
 

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User Review  - HadriantheBlind - LibraryThing

An extremely interesting history of the evolution of the relative power and influence of the executive branch of the American government. Written shortly after the Nixon administration, and the book ... Read full review

THE IMPERIAL PRESIDENCY

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. will be read because he is Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. That much is assured. But beyond the name and the campus fame, there is the fact that this is a perfectly satisfactory book ... Read full review

Contents

What the Founding Fathers Intended
1
Where the Founding Fathers Disagreed
13
The Rise of Presidential War
35
Congress Makes a Comeback
68
The Presidency Resurgent The Second World War
100
The Presidency Ascendant Korea
127
The Presidency Rampant Vietnam
177
The Revolutionary Presidency Washington
208
Democracy and Foreign Policy
278
The Secrecy System
331
The Future of the Presidency
377
After the Imperial Presidency
420
Notes
501
Index
551
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About the author (2004)

ARTHUR M. SCHLESINGER, JR., the author of sixteen books, was a renowned historian and social critic. He twice won the Pulitzer Prize, in 1946 for The Age of Jackson and in 1966 for A Thousand Days. He was also the winner of the National Book Award for both A Thousand Days and Robert Kennedy and His Times (1979). In 1998 he was awarded the prestigious National Humanities Medal.

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