Unmixing the Intellect: Aristotle on the Cognitive Powers and Bodily Organs

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2003 - Philosophy - 157 pages
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In recent years the majority of scholarship on Aristotle's philosophy of mind has concentrated on his account of sensation and has generally sought to find in his ancient account insights applicable to contemporary materialistic explanations of mental life. Challenging cognitivist and functionalist interpretations, this volume argues that Aristotle believed the mind to be unmixed, or separate from the body. Through careful textual analysis of De Anima and other key texts, the author shows that the Greek philosopher made a clear distinction between perception-an activity realized in material sense organs-and thinking-a process that cannot occur in any material organ. This innovative interpretation of Aristotle's theory of cognitive activities is a worthy contribution to an ongoing debate.

 

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Contents

IV
1
V
25
VI
53
VII
75
VIII
117
IX
145
X
153
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About the author (2003)

JOSEPH M. MAGEE is Director of Campus Ministry at the Catholic Student Center, Sam Houston State University,

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