A Supplement to Dodsley's Old Plays: The taming of a shrew. First sketch of the Merry wives of Windsor. First sketches of second and third parts of Henry VI. True tragedy of Richard III

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Shakespeare society, 1853 - English drama
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Page viii - The First Part of the Contention betwixt the two famous houses of Yorke and Lancaster, with the death of the good Duke Humphrey : And the banishment and death of the Duke of Suffolke, and the tragicall end of the...
Page v - The true Tragedie of Richard Duke of Yorke, and the death of good King Henrie the Sixt, with the whole contention betweene the two Houses Lancaster and Yorke, as it was sundrie times acted by the Right Honourable the Earle of Pembrooke his seruants.
Page xi - The | Whole Contention | betweene the two Famous | Houses, LANCASTER and | YORKE. | With the Tragicall ends of the good Duke Humfrey, Richard Duke of Yorke, | and King Henrie the \ sixt. \ Diuided into two Parts: And newly corrected and | enlarged. Written by William Shakespeare, Gent. | Printed at LONDON, for TP...
Page xxviii - Some say, good Will, which I, in sport, do sing, Had'st thou not played some kingly parts in sport, Thou hadst been a companion for a king. And been a King among the meaner sort.
Page vii - She was so well pleased with that admirable character of Falstaff, in The Two Parts of Henry the Fourth, that she commanded him to continue it for one play more, and to show him in love.
Page vii - Contention betwixt the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster, with the death of the good Duke Humphrey: And the banishment and death of the Duke of Suffolke, and the Tragicall end of the proud Cardinall of Winchester, with the notable Rebellion of lacke Cade : And the Duke of Yorkes first claime vnto the Crowne.
Page 1 - A Most pleasaunt and excellent conceited Comedie, of Syr lohn Falstaffe, and the merrie Wiues of Windsor. Entermixed with sundrie variable and pleasing humors, of Syr Hugh, the Welch Knight, Justice Shallow, and his wise Cousin, M. Slender. With the swaggering vaine of Auncient Pistoll, and Corporall Nym.
Page 78 - Da;monology," book ii., chap. 5, tells us, that "the Devil teacheth how to make pictures of wax or clay, that, by roasting thereof, the persons that they bear the name of may be continually melted or dried away by continual sickness.
Page xix - Windsor, thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me and make me my lady thy wife.
Page xxxv - Thirdly, playes have made the ignorant more apprehensive, taught the unlearned the knowledge of many famous histories, instructed such as cannot reade in the discovery of all our English chronicles...

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