The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age

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Routledge, Aug 27, 2003 - History - 288 pages
4 Reviews
It is hard to overestimate the importance of the contribution made by Dame Frances Yates to the serious study of esotericism and the occult sciences. To her work can be attributed the contemporary understanding of the occult origins of much of Western scientific thinking, indeed of Western civilization itself. The Occult Philosophy of the Elizabethan Age was her last book, and in it she condensed many aspects of her wide learning to present a clear, penetrating, and, above all, accessible survey of the occult movements of the Renaissance, highlighting the work of John Dee, Giordano Bruno, and other key esoteric figures. The book is invaluable in illuminating the relationship between occultism and Renaissance thought, which in turn had a profound impact on the rise of science in the seventeenth century. Stunningly written and highly engaging, Yates' masterpiece is a must-read for anyone interested in the occult tradition.
 

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User Review  - PaulBaldowski - LibraryThing

Interesting treatment of religion, society, and the occult, marred by Yates' flights of fantasy and tenuous connections in the second part of the book. Read full review

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User Review  - Poquette - LibraryThing

Much, much more than an introduction to Elizabethan Age philosophy, The Occult Philosophy is divided into three parts. The first part lays the medieval philosophical groundwork going back as far as ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Dame Francis Yates (1899-1981) was Reader in the History of the Renaissance at the Warburg Institute, University of London. The leading Renaissance scholar of her time, she was made a Dame of the British Empire in 1977 in recognition of her services to Renaissance studies. Her other publications include The Art of Memory and The Rosicrucian Enlightenment.

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