Hopi Katcinas Drawn by Native Artists

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U.S. Bureau of American Ethnology, 1903 - Hopi Indians - 124 pages
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Page 140 - Fr. ch in charmer q as th in wealth d pronounced with the tip of the tongue touching the upper teeth as in enunciating the English th ; this is the only sound of d in the language e as e in they, as a in may; Fr. ne e as in met, get, then; Germ, denn; Fr. sienne g as in gig; Germ, geben; Fr.
Page xvi - The screen is painted with appropriate symbols tending to heighten the illusion to the childlike minds of the audience, and it is perforated to permit the passage of masked effigies representing the mystical potencies, which are operated by shamans hidden behind the screen, something after the fashion of marionettes. The front of the stage is occupied by a symbolized field of corn; it is the...
Page 179 - So now, verily, her body continued to fall. Her body was falling some time before it emerged. Now she was surprised, seemingly, that there was light below, of a blue color. She looked and there seemed to be a lake at the spot toward which she was falling. There was nowhere any earth. There she saw many ducks on the lake where they, being waterfowl of all their kinds, floated severally about.
Page xxxix - ... continuing ethnological researches among the American Indians, under the direction of the Smithsonian Institution, including salaries or compensation of all necessary employees and the purchase of necessary books and periodicals, fifty thousand dollars, of which sum not exceeding one thousand five hundred dollars may be used for rent of building" (sundry civil act, March 3, 1901 ) $50, 000.
Page xx - Among these corn (that is, maize) occupies the first place; others are the turkey, two or three varieties of beans, certain squashes, besides the remarkable paratriptic tobacco, whose use has spread throughout the world since the time of Raleigh, and there are indications that the wild rice (Zizania) of the region of glacial lakes may constitute a notable addition to the list. Led to the subject by the work of the Bureau, the Department of Agriculture has instituted inquiries concerning the extent...
Page xvi - ... of a group of shamans occupying one side of the stage, and in part by human actors who wrestle with and finally overcome the evil marionettes. The entire dramatization stands on a higher plane than that prevalent among most of the...
Page xxvii - Audomaro Molina, of Merida, Yucatan, an eminent student of the Maya language, visited this country, and, learning of the proposal to publish the Diccionario de Motul, came to Washington to proffer his services in any further revision of the material that might seem desirable. His offer was gladly accepted, and provision was made for supplying him with copies of the transcript of the vocabulary. During the year Dr Franz Boas made additional contributions of importance to the linguistic collections...
Page xxxviii - Of late science has arisen, and men have turned to the contemplation of nature and have been led thence to the conquest of natural forces. In the strife against dull nature the manual side of man has again come into prominence, and the pages of later history are emblazoned with the names of inventors and experimentalists in whom the hand side and the brain side have attained perfect union. To this class of men Cushing belonged ; yet the application of his genius was peculiar, even unique, in that...
Page x - ... pioneers; and in addition to the aboriginal and accultural artifacts, the explorers were rewarded by finding the remains of a metallic armor, of European make, in such associations as to throw light on the beginning of warfare between red men and white. Later in the year the Director, accompanied by Prof. WH Holmes, of the United States National Museum, repaired to Cuba and Jamaica for the purpose of tracing lines of cultural migration between the great continents of the Western Hemisphere. The...
Page 219 - ... to befall him recurrently, that he becomes old in body, and that when, in fact, his body becomes ancient normally, he then retransforms his body in such wise that he becomes a new man-being again and again recovers his youth, so that one would think that he had just then grown to the size which a man-being customarily has when he reaches the youth of man-beings, as manifested by the change of voice at the age of puberty. Moreover, it is so that continuously the orenda immanent in his body—...

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