The history of the town and port of Sunderland, and the parishes of Bishopwearmouth and Monkwearmouth

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1830
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Page 150 - ... Bishop of Durham, (who, as Lord of the Manor, or as having jura regalia in the County Palatine, is supposed to be legally entitled to the soil of the Moor) to adopt such proceedings as might bring the rights of the freemen and stallingers to a fair trial and final decision ; but his Lordship having, under the direction of his advisers, declined to interfere until their title, to be a corporation, should be first tried by an information in the nature of quo warranto ; the Court of King's Bench...
Page 126 - Brancas, happening to reach the magazine, it blew up with a terrible explosion, and the vessel instantly went to the bottom. Out of seventy-five men, thirty-six were killed or wounded in the action, and all the rest, together with the wounded, perished in the deep, except three, who were picked up by the Dutch fishing boats.
Page 124 - At two o'clock, when the action had lasted an hour, the privateer running furiously in upon the larboard side of the Isabella, entangled her bowsprit among the main shrouds, and was lashed fast to her. Captain Andre now bawled out, in a menacing tone, "You English dog, strike.
Page 94 - The arch was turned on a light scaffolding, which gave no interruption whatever to the navigation of the river ; and the mode of bracing the ribs was so expeditious, that the whole structure was put together and thrown over the river in ten days, and the frame immediately removed. The whole expence of the undertaking was =?261 ,000 of which =22,000 was subscribed by Mr.
Page 124 - ... The captain of the privateer bawled out, " Strike, you English dog." Hornsby challenged him to come on board and strike his colours if he durst. The Frenchman then threw twenty men on board ; but a general discharge of blunderbusses from the Isabella's crew soon caused them to retreat. The ships now got disentangled, and the privateer tried to board on the starboard side ; when Hornsby and his mate shot each his man as they were lashing the ships together. The Frenchman again commanded him to...
Page 23 - ... defaults or annoyances be, as well within the liberties as without, by whom the truth may the rather be known, through whose default the said hurts and damages have happened, and who hath or holdeth any lands or tenements...
Page 25 - That the harbour and river there being very commodiously situated for the shipping of vast quantities of sea-coles, plentifully gotten and wrought there, for supply of all our subjects of our realm of England, who can fetch the same, as also of foreign parts, is of late so much gorged, stopped up, and choaked ; and by the many shoals, sand beds, and much breach and rubbish daily increasing In the same, is almost rendered unnavigable...
Page 26 - ... for conveying them away to the southward, where almost the whole trade lies ; and the wind that was fair to bring them from thence, was as unfavourable for their entering the harbour, especially when it blew hard southerly, which generally brought down the largest fleets. In such a case, it...
Page 125 - The ships being still lashed together, the enemy kept up a constant fire upon their close quarters; Hornsby returned the fire with spirit and effect. Observing them crowded together behind their mainmast for shelter, he aimed a blunderbuss, which happened to be doubly loaded, through a mistake, with twice twelve balls, which burst and threw him down ; but in an instant he started up, though much bruised. The blunderbuss made terrible havoc among the Frenchmen; they disentangled the ships, leaving...
Page 122 - ... He then cut the lashings and sheered off. Hornsby fired a gun ; upon which the magazine blew up, and the privateer went to. the bottom. Out of 75 men, 36 were killed or wounded ; all the rest perished in the deep, except three. The king presented Hornsby with a large gold medal for this heroic act. In the memorable engagement which Admiral Lord Duncan had with the Dutch fleet, on the llth October, 1797, the flag of the Venerable, Lord Duncan's ship, was shot away by the Dutch Admiral, De Winter....

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