How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They're Built

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Penguin, Oct 1, 1995 - Architecture - 252 pages
11 Reviews
Buildings have often been studies whole in space, but never before have they been studied whole in time. How Buildings Learn is a masterful new synthesis that proposes that buildings adapt best when constantly refined and reshaped by their occupants, and that architects can mature from being artists of space to becoming artists of time.

From the connected farmhouses of New England to I.M. Pei's Media Lab, from "satisficing" to "form follows funding," from the evolution of bungalows to the invention of Santa Fe Style, from Low Road military surplus buildings to a High Road English classic like Chatsworth—this is a far-ranging survey of unexplored essential territory.

More than any other human artifacts, buildings improve with time—if they're allowed to. How Buildings Learn shows how to work with time rather than against it.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - elenchus - LibraryThing

My approach is to examine buildings as a whole -- not just whole in space, but whole in time. Some buildings are designed and managed as a spatial whole, none as a temporal whole. In the absence of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jasonli - LibraryThing

"How Buildings Learn" is a seminal work on the life of buildings after they've been built and is then subject to the whims of its inhabitants, the weather, changes in technology and changes in ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
Cover Story
Flow
Shearing Layers
The Low Road
The High Road
No Road
Unreal Estate
The Romance of Maintenance
How Buildings Learn From Each Other
Satisficing Home and Office
The Scenariobuffered Building
Built for Change
The Study of Buildings in Time
Books for Timekindly Buildings
Index

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About the author (1995)

Though honored as a writer—with the National Book Award for the Whole Earth Catalog, Eliot Montroll Award for The Media Lab, Golden Gadfly Award for his years as editor of CoEvolution QuarterlySteward Brand is primarily an inventor/designer. Trained as a biologist and army officer, he was an early multimedia artist. He has created a number of lasting institutions, including New Games Tournaments, the Hackers Conference, and The WELL, a bellwether computer conference system. He is co-founder of Global Business Network, a futurist research organization fostering "the art of the long view."

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