The War of the Worlds

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Airmont Publishing Company, 1964 - Fiction - 160 pages
1005 Reviews

Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title--offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of "War of the Worlds" includes a Introduction, Biographical Note, and Afterword by James Gunn.

They came form outer space--Mars, to be exact.

With deadly heat-rays and giant fighting machine they want to conquer Earth and keep humans as their slaves.

Nothing seems to stop them as they spread terror and death across the planet. It is the start of the most important war in Earth's history.

And Earth will never be the same.

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An amazing story plot! - Goodreads
I decided I do not like the writing style of HG Wells. - Goodreads
Wells has a real knack for imagery and story telling. - Goodreads
The ending, sadly, is a little lame. - Goodreads
Well's prose in this book is fantastic. - Goodreads
Plus its a ripping great yarn! - Goodreads

Review: The War of the Worlds

User Review  - Owlseyes - Goodreads

A few days ago I have read this juicy article on a Portuguese magazine (Visão): 5th September...still missing 3290 days for a visit to Mars. The article speaks about NASA's visit by 2030. Yet, a Dutch ... Read full review

Review: The War of the Worlds

User Review  - Stuart - Goodreads

The War of the Worlds: Martians come to England and they're not here for tea Originally posted at Fantasy Literature This classic alien invasion story from 1897 hardly needs any introduction. We all ... Read full review

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About the author (1964)

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, England, the son of an unsuccessful merchant. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a dry-goods merchant, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology under the British biologist and educator, Thomas Henry Huxley. After graduating, Wells took several different teaching positions and began writing for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. Wells's first major novel, The Time Machine (1895), launched his career as a writer, and he began to produce a steady stream of science-fiction tales, short stories, realistic novels, and books of sociology, history, science, and biography, producing one or more books a year. Much of Wells's work is forward-looking, peering into the future of prophesy social and scientific developments, sometimes with amazing accuracy. Along with French writer Jules Verne, Wells is credited with popularizing science fiction, and such novels as The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds (1898) are still widely read. Many of Wells's stories are based on his own experiences. The History of Mr. Polly (1910) draws on the life of Wells's father. Kipps (1905) uses Wells's experience as an apprentice, and Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900) draws on Wells's experiences as a school teacher. Wells also wrote stories showing how the world could be a better place. One such story is A Modern Utopia (1905). As a writer, Wells's range was exceptionally wide and his imagination extremely fertile. While time may have caught up with him (many of the things he predicted have already come to pass), he remains an interesting writer because of his ability to tell a lively tale.

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